A Snapshot of Policing in Baltimore County

Over the past couple of years’ law enforcement agencies across the country have faced intense public scrutiny about officer conduct and the use of force by officers on the citizens they serve.  Recent events both nationally and local have gained widespread attention on both traditional and social media. This has created this firestorm of rhetoric that police officers in America are out of control, running rampant throughout the community, with no regard for citizen rights and no mechanism to discipline officers for misconduct.  As you can see from the statistics below, this is simply not accurate for the members of the Baltimore County Police Department.

 

Year County Population Calls for Service Assaults on Officers Arrests Uses of Force Citizen Complaints
2010 805,029 604,706 957 33,898 329 128
2011 805,029 576,017 955 29,959 354 109
2012 817,455 585,112 798 29,439 377 126
2013 817,455 580,416 692 27,982 318 124
2014 824,000 572,289 659 26,989 305 89
2015 824,000 582,894 660 25,651 300 85

 

County Population

The county population has steadily grown since 2010 with an increase of approximately 19,000 (2%) over the next five (5) years. Demographics available on the county website showed that in 2010 the population was 64% white, 26% African American, 4% Hispanic, 6% other.

Calls for Service
The number of calls for service shown includes all calls to 911, non-emergency calls and traffic stops. This does not take into account the numerous undocumented interactions with citizens that officers have every day.

Calls for service for the time period shown have shown a steady decline. The average number of calls for service was 583,572.  Every year since 2013 has been under the average.

Arrests

In Baltimore County between 2010 and 2015 there were a total of 173,918 arrests made.  That equates to an average of 28,986 arrests per year in a county where the population has grown to 824,000. Every year since 2011 has been under the average. The number of arrests has consistently trended downward since 2010 (24%) while the population has steadily grown.

Uses of Force by Officers

In the Baltimore County Police Department, a “use of force” report must be completed when an officer uses force involving Department issued equipment, personal equipment, an instrument of necessity (excluding firearms) and/or when injuries (visible or non-visible) have occurred to an individual that indicate medical treatment may be necessary.

In the six years indicated above, Baltimore County officers used force (excluding firearms) a total of 1,983 times.  From 2012-2015 there has been a 20% decrease in uses of force by officers.  Additionally, the statistics show that force was only used in 00.056633% of all calls for service and 01.14% in all arrests.

Internal Affairs statistics show that officers were involved in combat shootings 37 times during the same time period averaging about 6.1 per year.  This equates to the use of a firearm in 00.00123% of all calls for service and in 00.02127% of all arrests.

Assaults on Officers

During the 6-year time period officers reported being assaulted 4,721 times averaging 786.8 assaults per year. (There has been 1 line of duty death) While assaults on officers have been trending downward (32%), the numbers show that officers in Baltimore County are 2.3 times more likely to be assaulted by a citizen than use force against a citizen.

Citizen Complaints
According to the Internal Affairs Section in the Baltimore County Police Department there were 661 complaints from citizens about officer misconduct, including uses of force.  That equates to an average of 110 per year and has also been steadily trending downward (33.5%). Over the entire time period there was an average of 1 citizen complaint for every 5,297 calls for service. The best year was 2015 with 1 citizen complaint for every 6,857 calls for service.

Administrative Complaints

An Administrative complaint is defined as a complaint filed by members internally within the police department.  According to the Internal Affairs Section in the Baltimore County Police Department there were 579 complaints initiated from within the department from 2010-2015.  That equates to an average of 96.5 per year and 46.6% of all Internal Affairs investigations.

Closing

The style and manner of policing is constantly evolving. Moving forward with the challenges in policing, law enforcement is adapting a style of policing that encourages community partnership. We must still focus on crime because there will always be incidents that need to be investigated and violent criminals that need to be arrested. But we need to do both and we need to do them better and together.

There is a very select group of citizens in a part of Maryland that has a mistrust of their police department and that is unfortunate.  That is certainly not the case in Baltimore County.  We enjoy an excellent working relationship with the community we serve.

David Rose
Second Vice President
Baltimore County
Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #4

FOP Lodge #4 Response to the County Executive’s Body Camera Announcement

Over the past year law enforcement agencies across the country have faced intense public scrutiny about officer conduct and the use of force by officers on the citizens they serve. Recent events both nationally and local have gained widespread attention on both traditional and social media. This has created this firestorm of rhetoric that police officers in America are out of control, running rampant throughout the community, with no regard for citizen rights and no mechanism to discipline officers for misconduct. That is certainly not the case in Baltimore County. We enjoy a good working relationship with the community we serve. While BWC’s may be an appropriate and much needed tool in some police agencies, there have been no significant incidents or systematic problems within the department resulting in a call from the community for Body Worn Cameras (BWC). There is no evidence that the cost of a BWC program in Baltimore County would be offset in savings from fewer lawsuits. Once in place, a body worn program will be difficult to terminate or scale back, leaving the county with a significant, permanent fiscal obligation and little financial payoff. Such cost would be passed on to the taxpayer.

It appears, given the statistics below that a BWC program in Baltimore County may be a solution for a problem that does not exist and given the significant cost and complexity of the program it would be a misuse of tax dollars to move forward on a BWC program at this time.

Year County Population Calls for Service Assaults on Officers Arrests Uses of Force Citizen Complaints
2009 789,814 623,520 839 34,447 391 156
2010 801,700 604,706 957 33,898 329 128
2011 805,029 576,017 955 29,959 354 109
2012 817,455 585,112 798 29,439 377 126
2013 817,455 580,416 692 27,982 318 124
2014 824,000 572,289 659 26,989 305 89
3,542,060 4,900 182,714 2,074 732

Calls for Service
The number of calls for service shown includes all calls to 911, non emergency calls and traffic stops. This does not take into account the numerous undocumented interactions with citizens that officers have every day.

Calls for service for the time period shown have shown a steady decline of 8%. The average number of calls for service was 590,343. Every year since 2011 has been under the average.

Arrests
In Baltimore County between 2009 and 2014 there were a total of 182,714 arrests made. That equates to an average of 30,452 arrests per year in a county where the population has grown to 824,000. Every year since 2011 has been under the average. The number of arrests has consistently trended downward since 2009 while the population has steadily grown.

Uses of Force by Officers
In the Baltimore County Police Department a “use of force” report must be completed when an officer uses force involving Department issued equipment, personal equipment, an instrument of necessity (excluding firearms) and/or when injuries (visible or non visible) have occurred to an individual that indicate medical treatment may be necessary.

In the six years indicated above Baltimore County officers used force (excluding firearms) a total of 2,074 times. From 2009-2014 there has been a 22% decrease in uses of force by officers. Additionally, the statistics show that force was only used in 00.0585534% of all calls for service and 01.1351073% in all arrests.

Internal Affairs stats show that officers were involved in combat shootings 34 times during the same time period averaging about 5.6 per year. This equates to the use of a firearm in 00.0009598% of all calls for service and in 00.0186083% of all arrests.

Assaults on Officers
During the 6 year time period officers reported being assaulted 4,900 times averaging 816.6 assaults per year. (There has been 1 line of duty death) While assaults on officers have been trending downward, the numbers showed that officers in Baltimore County are 2.3 times more likely to be assaulted by a citizen than use force against a citizen.

Citizen Complaints
According to the Internal Affairs Section in the Baltimore County Police Department there were 732 complaints from citizens about officer misconduct, including uses of force. That equates to an average of 122 per year and has also been steadily trending downward (42.9%). Over the entire time period there was an average of 1 citizen complaint for every 4,838 calls for service. The best year was 2014 with 1 citizen complaint for every 6,430 calls for service.

Baltimore County Seeks Delay in Pension Age Discrimination Case

Damages phase will be ‘lengthy, costly and complex,’ court told

By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun

7:23 PM EST, November 13, 2012

Baltimore County has asked a judge to suspend proceedings in an age-discrimination case, saying in federal court filings that determining damages owed to employees and retirees could be a “lengthy, costly and complex” process that requires the review of 10,000 pension files.

County officials think it could take at least two years to determine how much people are owed in the case, according to the court documents. U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg ruled last month that the county’s pension system discriminates because older workers had to pay more toward their retirement than younger workers.

The county denies wrongdoing and has filed a motion asking the district court’s permission to appeal the recent decision to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission sued the county in 2007, alleging that the pension system violated the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act.

“We think that there’s time and expense to be spared if we get the … Fourth Circuit to look” at the case, County Attorney Mike Field said Tuesday.

County officials have said Legg’s decision could mean increased pension contributions for thousands of workers.

“The county believes that [the court’s decision] is erroneous as a matter of law and may ultimately work an extreme injustice and impose an extreme financial burden on the Employees’ Retirement System and its thousands of members,” the county’s lawyers contend in the recent court filings.

The county estimated five years ago that damages could total $17 million to $19 million, according to the legal documents. The county has not released an updated projection.

Lawyers for the EEOC contend that calculating damages would not be as time-consuming as the county says, pointing to information the county has already produced during the litigation.

“The EEOC concedes that the calculation of relief is likely to be more complex than in typical discrimination cases and will require expert actuarial services,” the agency’s lawyers wrote in response to the county’s motions. “However, there is no reason to believe that the relief phase would be lengthy, require the review of thousands of paper documents, or be unduly costly.”

The legal papers show the county does not want to pursue mediation to work out potential damages, a step the EEOC wants to take.

Labor unions representing county workers also were named as defendants by the EEOC because the unions must negotiate with the county to make changes to the pension system. Attorneys for the groups oppose the county’s attempt to delay proceedings, writing in court documents that “the litigation should proceed to address the matter of remedy expeditiously, fairly and definitely.”

The county changed its pension system in 2007 so that members contribute at a flat rate not based on their age. About 9,000 employees and 6,000 retirees belong to the $2 billion system.

alisonk@baltsun.com

Copyright © 2012, The Baltimore Sun

What does the FOP win in the Retiree Subsidy Case mean for you?

You are only included in the case if you retired between February 1, 1992 and June 30, 2007.

If you retired during that period your health care subsidy (percentage) should have never changed. At that time we had contract language that prevented it.

What this decision means is that if your subsidy was changed, the County owes you a refund.  Everyone in this case will have a different amount owed to him/her depending on the plan (PPO, HMO) or whether you were single, parent/child or family plan.

At this time there is no time table for refunds to be sent out.  Individual calculations have to be made for all those affected and verified.

As more information becomes available we will communicate that to the membership.

Congratulations to all those affected!!

More Law Enforcement Agencies Require Body Armor

A rising number of law enforcement officers are required to wear body armor after two consecutive years in which police were being killed by gunfire with increasing frequency, a new Justice Department study has found.

Ninety-two percent of officers reported that their agencies now have mandatory body armor policies, up from 59% in a similar 2009 survey.

The jump also comes in the wake of a 2010 directive by Attorney General Eric Holder, who warned that local police risked losing millions of dollars in federal aid if body armor did not become mandatory.

The new report, based on a survey of more than 1,000 officers, also found that 78% of police said their agencies had written policies related to mandatory body armor use, up from 45% in 2009.

Although the 2009 report surveyed 782 police agencies, the new study drew information from officers on the street — mainly from large agencies — to measure their understanding of and compliance with new or existing policies.

Nearly 90% of officers at agencies that required body armor to be worn said they complied with the mandatory-wear policies “all of the time.”

“For a number of years, the data has shown that police have been targeted simply because they are police,” said Chuck Wexler, executive director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a law enforcement think tank which performed both studies.

“The Justice Department had a responsibility to mandate this, and the police departments had a responsibility to institute these policies,” Wexler said. “This clearly shows that departments are stepping up.”

The report comes as firearm-related police fatalities have declined 34% so far this year, compared with the same period last year, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, which closely tracks fatalities involving law enforcement in the line of duty.

Wexler said that while it is “encouraging” that the number of firearms fatalities is declining this year after increases in 2010 and 2011, the study did not examine body armor policies and compliance among the officers who were killed.

“Can we say there has been a cause and effect (related to the new mandatory policies)? No,” Wexler said. “But it is not unreasonable to say that these policies may be a contributing factor.”

Police use of body armor has long been a source of contention, especially in the South where sweltering summer heat is often the leading explanation for why bullet resistant vests remain in the trunks of patrol cars.

Houston police officials faced the same complaints in 2007 when the department began requiring all officers to wear body armor while in uniform. But police Chief Charles McClelland said much of the opposition disappeared two weeks after the policy was announced when an officer was shot—and saved—by a bullet-resistant vest.

McClelland said the officer, who had never worn armor before the directive was issued, was shot at multiple times by a gunman who was armed with a 9 mm handgun. One of the rounds struck the officer “in the center of the chest,” the chief said. “I don’t think there is much doubt that the vest saved his life.”

In addition to firearms-related incidents, Craig Floyd, chairman and chief executive officer of the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, said body armor also protects officers in car accidents and in knife attacks.

“Clearly, the new data indicates that message on officer safety is sinking in,” Floyd said.

It is unclear whether the increase in mandatory armor policies was driven by the threat of losing federal aid or whether two years of rising officer deaths prompted the actions.

But the Justice report found that 90% of officers who comply with their department policies cited “critical” safety reasons. Nearly 50% referred to agency requirements and 14% cited “family pressure” as among the factors in their decisions to wear the equipment.

“I would like to think that my contemporaries are putting these policies in place for the right reasons, not simply out of concern that they might lose some (federal) money,” McClelland said. “No chief wants to be in a position of having to present a folded flag to a loved one of a police officer when there was something that could have been done to prevent a death.”

Los Angeles Police Protection League Challenge Mayor Over Pensions

LAPPL challenges Richard Riordan to publicly debate his controversial pension plan

Los Angeles, November 13, 2012- Los Angeles Police Protective League President Tyler Izen today presented former Mayor Richard Riordan a challenge: a series of three public debates over the merits of the pension scheme he is trying to qualify for the ballot, on days and times of Riordan’s choosing, before December 7.

In light of his self-proclaimed belief in the importance of civic education and an engaged and informed electorate, which he expressed as recently as October 27, 2012 in a panel he headed at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, we are confident that Mr. Riordan will eagerly accept this challenge to debate.

“I am challenging Richard Riordan to three debates between now and December 7 because he has yet to offer any independent analysis that supports his wild claims. Riordan has chosen to hide behind carefully orchestrated radio talk show appearances where no challenging or insightful questions are asked, appearances before groups where he knows his ideas won’t be challenged, and well-crafted media releases that lack any pretense of substance,” said Izen.

The Riordan charter change initiative titled “New Defined Contribution Plan; Amendments to Existing Retirement Plans” will dramatically increase the City’s required payments to the three Los Angeles pension systems. These increased costs, which will be in addition to already scheduled contributions, would take effect as soon as the systems are closed to all future employees, and will continue at the increased level for a decade or more. This means less money for public safety and other vital City services.

“Riordan repeatedly claims that rising City costs will lead to bankruptcy. It therefore makes no sense for voters to adopt a pension scheme that immediately and for a lengthy period of time increases City costs. His plan isn’t factually supported and doesn’t save the City money,” said Izen.

In the past 18 months, nine separate states and New York City have examined and rejected closing their respective defined benefit pension systems. After study and debate, it was determined that closing the pension system would not save money, but instead would be more costly than continuing with the existing pension system. For example, this year New Hampshire commissioned two separate actuarial studies on the costs of closing their pension plan to new employees. The reports concluded that “total pension funding costs would rise” and that “in all areas” transition to a “proposed defined contribution plan will be more expensive to employers and employees than maintaining the current defined benefit system,” with an added result of cost shifting to future generations.

“Richard Riordan chose to go to the public and try to place this poorly thought-out scheme on the May 2013 ballot. Because of his personal wealth, we know that he does not have to debate to have his plan qualify for the ballot. However, if he has any confidence in his plan, he will relish the opportunity to debate me so that he can explain in detail the merits of his plan and outline specifically why voters should sign petitions to place it on the ballot,” concluded Izen.

In Memory of Bro. Robert W. Zimmerman (Police Officer)

In Memory of … Bro. Robert W. Zimmerman (Police Officer) …

The Lodge pauses today to honor the memory of Bro. Robert W. Zimmerman on the Anniversary of his line-of-duty death, November 14, 1986.

On November 5, 1986, Officer Robert Zimmerman was struck by a vehicle and critically injured while on foot patrol on Edmondson Avenue. Officer Zimmerman died nine days later on November 14, 1986 as a result of his injuries.

A wreath has been placed at the BCoPD Memorial in his memory.

May he rest in peace …

Death Notification: Joseph Michael Gattus

GATTUS , Joseph Michael Suddenly, on November 9, 2012, JOSEPH MICHAEL GATTUS; cherished son to Kathleen Gattus and the late Lt. John M. Gattus, Jr.; loving brother to Michael J. Gattus and his wife Jennifer; dear nephew to Marie Crouse, Dorothy Bigos, and Norma and Dan Steinert.
Relatives and friends may call at CONNELLY FUNERAL HOME OF DUNDALK, 7110 Sollers Point Road, Wednesday, 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 PM. A Mass of Christian Burial to celebrate Joseph’s life will be held Thursday at 10 AM at Sacred Heart of Mary Catholic Church, 6736 Youngstown Ave. Online condolences may also be made at
www.connelllyfuneralhomeofdundalk.com

Death Notification: Mary Maenner

Mary Maenner, spouse to deceased Retired Officer James Maenner, passed away yesterday, Tuesday, November 13, 2012.
Viewing will take place on Thursday, November 15, 2012 at Evans Funeral Home located at 3 Newport Drive, in Bel Air.
Funeral arrangements will be held on Friday, November 16, 2012.

NFI

For police, not wearing seat belts can be fatal mistake

By Ashley Halsey III, WASHINGTON POST, Published: October 14

By the time his police cruiser tumbled to a halt in the underbrush beside the interstate in August, the young police officer had been flung clear of the car to his death, the same fate that had been suffered by 139 other officers nationwide who were ejected from their vehicles when not using a seat belt.

Although most state’s laws require police to use seat belts, federal data show that only about half of them do, and over the past three decades, 19 percent of the officers killed in accidents were ejected from their vehicles.

“We’ve been told it’s ‘I want to be able to get out of the car quickly, it interferes with my gun or it interferes with my belt, it interferes with my driving.’ All the wrong reasons,” said Geoffrey P. Alpert, a University of South Carolina professor who has studied high-risk police activities for more than 25 years. “I can understand if you’re pulling up to a scene and you undo your seat belt because you want to be able to get out quickly, but not when you’re going 100 miles an hour on the freeway.”

Prince George’s County Police Officer Adrian Morris died of head injuries Aug. 20 after being thrown from his cruiser when it left Interstate 95 during the high-speed chase of a stolen car. His partner, Mike Risher, was buckled in the passenger seat. He was treated at and released from a hospital that day.

That incident came a week after a Fairfax County police officer whose name has not been released was involved in a fatal accident. The officer was headed east on Franconia Road just before 3 a.m. Aug. 13 when a car swerved in front of his cruiser, striking it head-on. The car burst into flames, and its driver died. The officer was trapped, but he was pulled free and survived.

“Thank God he had his seat belt on,” said Capt. Susan H. Culin, who heads the county’s traffic division. “He’s very adamant that his seat belt saved his life.”

Seat belts and air bags have made the high-risk pursuit of criminal suspects less deadly than it once was, but for more than a dozen years, traffic fatalities killed more police officers than bullets did. The trend was reversed last year, when the number killed by gunfire — 68 — was four more than the number who died in traffic incidents.

The question of when police should chase a fleeing suspect has been debated in public and law enforcement circles for years, leading most police departments to delineate their rules. Research has shown that 1 percent of chases end in a fatality and that an officer dies as the result of a pursuit every 11 weeks.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration determined that 139 officers died when ejected from their vehicles in crashes between 1980 and 2008 and that only 45 percent of the 733 officers who died in crashes during the period had their seat belts fastened.

By contrast, 84 percent of all American drivers use their seat belts, the NHTSA estimates.

In Prince George’s, the importance of officers using seat belts is stressed in the annual in-service training, a portion of which is devoted to safe driving, police said.

Kevin F. Davis, the county’s assistant police chief, says the educational effort is essential to changing the way officers think about using their seat belts.

“You can change any policy and procedure that you want to change, reduce it to writing and stick it in your 400-500 page general order manual, but you’re not making any headway unless you change the culture,” Davis said.

He calls the three reasons most officers give for eschewing the seat belt — it gets tangled with their gun belt, it delays their exit from the car and it hampers their ability to dodge a bullet — “absolutely absurd.”

“It’s a bunch of garbage, and I just don’t buy it,” he said.

When officers get older, gain more experience and, particularly, when they start a family, they begin to see the wisdom of seat belt use, Davis said.

In addition to culture change, more training and new policies, Davis said the department plans to hold district commanders responsible for ensuring that their officers get the message.

“As long as it remains on their daily radar screen, we think that that will be half the battle in changing the culture about wearing seat belts in a police car,” Davis said, adding that punishment for officers should be greater than the current written reprimand. “That, arguably, doesn’t go far enough to modify someone’s behavior.”

Alpert said he has seen the influence of the Prince George’s efforts.

“I was at the Prince George’s County [police department] the other day, and there’s a sign as you leave the parking lot, ‘put on your seat belt on,’ something to that effect,” Alpert said. “They do have a policy. They’re very concerned about it. But I’ve seen officers elsewhere wear their seat belt off the lot, then take if off and click it behind because they think they can do their jobs better” if they don’t wear a seat belt.

He said some officers wear seat belts when off duty but not when on patrol.

“There are a lot of reasons why the police put themselves, I don’t want to say above the law, but around the law,” Alpert said. “One of the solutions is to convince officers that it doesn’t really impede your ability to do your work and the incredible safety net it provides for you.”

Culin said Fairfax police parking lots have similar signs at their exits. She said the department launched a buckle-up campaign after a visual survey found that 25 percent of officers were not wearing seat belts.

Even after an effort that included reminders at every shift roll call, she said 21 percent of officers continued to ignore the pleas.

“It’s changing human behavior, and that’s very difficult to do,” she said. “It’s something we have to keep harping about with the officers. It’s a real issue. It’s an issue here, and it’s a pressing issue nationwide.”

The roll call of officers who weren’t wearing seat belts when they died in crashes includes Louisiana Deputy Sheriff Randall Benoit, 41, who was hit from behind this year on a state highway. Another local Louisiana officer, John Kendall, 64, was ejected from his cruiser four months earlier after he hit a pickup truck.

The last officer to die in the line of duty in Prince George’s before Morris, Thomas P. Jenson, was not wearing a seat belt in 2010 when his cruiser skidded on a patch of ice and hit a pole.

“A seat belt absolutely would have saved his life,” Davis said.

That year, Houston officer Eydelman Mani, 30, was responding to a call at 60 mph when his patrol car hit a guardrail. A New Jersey officer, John Abraham, 37, died when his cruiser hit a utility pole in Teaneck.

An officer with the Bureau of Indian Affairs, Joshua Yazzie, 33, was hurled from his patrol car when it rolled off an embankment on a Ute reservation in Utah.

St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom mandated strict enforcement of the department’s seat belt requirement after two officers who weren’t wearing them — Julius Moore, 23, and David Haynes, 27 — died in crashes within five months.

The events leading to Morris’s death in Prince George’s unfolded as things often do in routine police work. He and Risher were investigating a car break-in at a Laurel gas station when a silver Acura linked to the break-in passed by.

With overhead lights flashing, they pursued the car onto I-95. Chasing at high speed, Morris lost control of the cruiser and it tumbled into a ravine. He was thrown from the car and suffered fatal head injuries.

“I think he wasn’t wearing his seat belt because of the excitement of the moment, of seeing a bad guy from a parking lot,” Davis said. “He just forgot. From what I understand, he was a religious seat belt wearer.”

 

 

 

General Investigator

General Investigator Position
Ryan Young Indemnity Insurance Company
Sparks Maryland
Pay is negotiable
send resume’ to or call 410-472-6000 ext. 123

University of MD

The University of MD in Baltimore, Department of Public Safety is currently recruiting for University Police Officers I & II positions. Please direct any interested parties to view the job description and to apply using the following links:

University Police Officer I Link: https://www.healthcaresource.com/umbaltimore/index.cfm?fuseaction=search.jobDetails&template=dsp_job_details.cfm&cJobId=284137

University Police Officer II (Currently MPTC Certified) Link: https://www.healthcaresource.com/umbaltimore/index.cfm?fuseaction=search.jobDetails&template=dsp_job_details.cfm&cJobId=973656

Thanks as always for your support and assistance with promoting this opportunity!

Regards,

Raymond P. Taylor
Staffing Specialist
University of Maryland
620 W. Lexington Street, 3rd Floor

Phone: 410.706.7171

Fax: 410.706.8178

Email:

Website: www.hr.umaryland.edu

Northwest Hospital

Northwest Hospital, a member of the LifeBridge Health system, is expanding the role of it’s security force to include sworn uniformed Police Officers.

We are looking to hire Baltimore County Police officers to work along our Security staff in the Emergency Department.

Sworn County Police Officers will work along side our security staff to maintain a safe and secure environment with a focus on our Emergency Room.

Northwest Hospital is 280 bed acute care hospital in Randallstown, with over 70,000 patients seen in the emergency department last year.

The Security department is under the leadership of Chuck Moore as Director of Security, and Richard Handshoe as Security manager.
Both are retired members from the Baltimore County Police Department.

The Northwest Security Department employes 27 highly trained security officers and provides coverage for the hospital 24/7, 365 days a year.

Baltimore County Officers will be hired under the Uniform Secondary Agreement with the County Police Department.

Shifts will be 1900-0300 on weekend nights.

Interested Officers should contact Chuck Moore at 410-521-7080 or by e-mail at

Death Notification:Wilbert Charles Doran Sr.

The Lodge regrets to announce the death of Mr. Wilbert Charles Doran Sr., grandfather of Officer Angela Blankenship and Officer Dan Doran, on November 5, 2012.
The viewing will be held on Sunday November 11, 2012 from 3-5 and 7-9 at Miller and Dippel Funeral Home located at 6415 Belair Road, Baltimore, MD 21206.
A funeral service will be held at Miller and Dippel Funeral home beginning at 1100 on November 12, 2012.
Interment will be at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens located at 200 East Padonia Road Timonium, MD 21093.

Death Notification:Beatrice E. Marsteller

The Lodge regrets to announce the death of Beatrice E. Marsteller, the mother of Detective Rob Marsteller C.I.D./Burglary Unit and the mother in-law of Police Officer 1st Class Kevin Kahl Pc07. The family is excepting friends and family on Monday Nov. 12, 2012 from 2 to 4pm and 6 to 8pm at J.J. Hartenstein’s Funeral Home, 24 North Second St. New Freedom, PA 17349.
There will be a private funeral service on Nov. 13, 2012 at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Freeland MD. A burial service will immediately follow at Pine Grove Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers the family requesting contributions be made to either BNCC Food Bank, PO Box 211 Monkton, MD 21111 or House of Hope, 3899 Sticks Rd. Glen Rock, Pa 17237.