Death Notification:Beatrice E. Marsteller

The Lodge regrets to announce the death of Beatrice E. Marsteller, the mother of Detective Rob Marsteller C.I.D./Burglary Unit and the mother in-law of Police Officer 1st Class Kevin Kahl Pc07. The family is excepting friends and family on Monday Nov. 12, 2012 from 2 to 4pm and 6 to 8pm at J.J. Hartenstein’s Funeral Home, 24 North Second St. New Freedom, PA 17349.
There will be a private funeral service on Nov. 13, 2012 at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Freeland MD. A burial service will immediately follow at Pine Grove Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers the family requesting contributions be made to either BNCC Food Bank, PO Box 211 Monkton, MD 21111 or House of Hope, 3899 Sticks Rd. Glen Rock, Pa 17237.

Death Notification: Robert Eugene Lyles Sr.

The Lodge regrets to announce the passing of Robert Eugene Lyles Sr., grandfather of Officer Nathan Lyles PC8/CAT, on Sunday, November 4th, 2012.
A viewing will be held at Estep Brothers Funeral Home, 1300 Eutaw Pl. 21217, on Tuesday, November 13th, 2012, between the hours of 3pm and 7pm.

Death Notification: James Morgan Jr.

The Lodge regrets to announce the passing of James Morgan Jr. on November 9, 2012, the father of Sergeant Chris Morgan.
The viewing will take place today, Monday November 12th from 1500 – 1700 & 1900 to 2100 hours at the Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk.
The funeral service will be held at Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, 7922 Wise Avenue on Tuesday morning November 13, 2012 at 1100 hours.

Interment will be at Oak Lawn Cemetery located at 7225 Eastern Avenue, 21224.

In lieu of flowers please make a donation in James Morgan Jr.’s name to the American Diabetes Association, 800 Wyman Park Drive Suite 110 Baltimore, Maryland, 21211.

Death Notification: James Morgan Jr.

The Lodge regrets to announce the passing of James Morgan Jr. on November 9, 2012, the father of Sergeant Chris Morgan.
The viewing will take place today, Monday November 12th from 1500 – 1700 & 1900 to 2100 hours at the Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk.

The funeral service will be held at Duda-Ruck Funeral Home of Dundalk, 7922 Wise Avenue on Tuesday morning November 13, 2012 at 1100 hours.

Interment will be at Oak Lawn Cemetery located at 7225 Eastern Avenue, 21224.

In lieu of flowers please make a donation in James Morgan Jr.’s name to the American Diabetes Association, 800 Wyman Park Drive Suite 110 Baltimore, Maryland, 21211.

Death Notification: Robert Eugene Lyles Sr.

The Lodge regrets to announce the passing of Robert Eugene Lyles Sr., grandfather of Officer Nathan Lyles PC8/CAT, on Sunday, November 4th, 2012.
A viewing will be held at Estep Brothers Funeral Home, 1300 Eutaw Pl. 21217, on Tuesday, November 13th, 2012, between the hours of 3pm and 7pm.

Death Notification:Beatrice E. Marsteller

The Lodge regrets to announce the death of Beatrice E. Marsteller, the mother of Detective Rob Marsteller C.I.D./Burglary Unit and the mother in-law of Police Officer 1st Class Kevin Kahl Pc07. The family is excepting friends and family on Monday Nov. 12, 2012 from 2 to 4pm and 6 to 8pm at J.J. Hartenstein’s Funeral Home, 24 North Second St. New Freedom, PA 17349.
There will be a private funeral service on Nov. 13, 2012 at Mt. Zion United Methodist Church, Freeland MD. A burial service will immediately follow at Pine Grove Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers the family requesting contributions be made to either BNCC Food Bank, PO Box 211 Monkton, MD 21111 or House of Hope, 3899 Sticks Rd. Glen Rock, Pa 17237.

Death Notification:Wilbert Charles Doran Sr.

The Lodge regrets to announce the death of Mr. Wilbert Charles Doran Sr., grandfather of Officer Angela Blankenship and Officer Dan Doran, on November 5, 2012.
The viewing will be held on Sunday November 11, 2012 from 3-5 and 7-9 at Miller and Dippel Funeral Home located at 6415 Belair Road, Baltimore, MD 21206.
A funeral service will be held at Miller and Dippel Funeral home beginning at 1100 on November 12, 2012.
Interment will be at Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens located at 200 East Padonia Road Timonium, MD 21093.

Employment Opportunities

Northwest Hospital, a member of the LifeBridge Health system, is expanding the role of it’s security force to include sworn uniformed Police Officers.

We are looking to hire Baltimore County Police officers to work along our Security staff in the Emergency Department.

Sworn County Police Officers will work along side our security staff to maintain a safe and secure environment with a focus on our Emergency Room.

Northwest Hospital is 280 bed acute care hospital in Randallstown, with over 70,000 patients seen in the emergency department last year.

The Security department is under the leadership of Chuck Moore as Director of Security, and Richard Handshoe as Security manager.

Both are retired members from the Baltimore County Police Department.

The Northwest Security Department employes 27 highly trained security officers and provides coverage for the hospital 24/7, 365 days a year.

Baltimore County Officers will be hired under the Uniform Secondary Agreement with the County Police Department.

Shifts will be 1900-0300 on weekend nights.

Interested Officers should contact Chuck Moore at 410-521-7080 or by e-mail at cdmoore@lifebridgehealth.org

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Anyone that might be interested in doing some physical security consulting work send your resume and a phone number where you can be contacted to

John Reginaldi
jreginaldi@comcast.net

443-865-9514

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The University of MD in Baltimore, Department of Public Safety is currently recruiting for University Police Officers I & II positions. Please direct any interested parties to view the job description and to apply using the following links:

University Police Officer I Link: https://www.healthcaresource.com/umbaltimore/index.cfm?fuseaction=search.jobDetails&template=dsp_job_details.cfm&cJobId=284137

University Police Officer II (Currently MPTC Certified) Link: https://www.healthcaresource.com/umbaltimore/index.cfm?fuseaction=search.jobDetails&template=dsp_job_details.cfm&cJobId=973656

Thanks as always for your support and assistance with promoting this opportunity!

Regards,

Raymond P. Taylor
Staffing Specialist
University of Maryland
620 W. Lexington Street, 3rd Floor

Phone: 410.706.7171

Fax: 410.706.8178

Email: rtaylor@af.umaryland.edu

Website: www.hr.umaryland.edu

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General Investigator Position
Ryan Young Indemnity Insurance Company
Sparks Maryland
Pay is negotiable
send resume’ to Ryoung@IICDC.com or call 410-472-6000 ext. 123

 

 

Baltimore Co. AFSCME members rally against Kamenetz

Workers have been without contract since July

By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun

7:35 PM EDT, November 1, 2012

A Baltimore County union representing about 800 public employees filed an unfair labor practices complaint against the county Thursday, asking for an independent investigation after working for five months without a contract.

Members of Local 921 of the American Federation of State, Municipal and County Employees have been without a contract since July and say the county administration has not negotiated in good faith to reach an agreement. The union’s members include heavy-equipment operators, truck and snowplow drivers, and sewage workers.

Dozens of AFSMCE members and statewide labor leaders gathered outside the county courthouse in Towson after they filed the complaint, chanting underneath a giant inflatable rat on which they hung photos of County Executive Kevin Kamenetz. The union filed a lawsuit last month seeking arbitration. The Thursday filing asks the county labor commissioner to appoint a third party to investigate the union’s complaints that the county is not honoring terms of its expired contract.

“This has been a long dispute with the county, and we need to push on what available avenues we have,” AFSCME Council 67 staff representative Ryan Genovese said.

Don Mohler, Kamenetz’s chief of staff, said the administration believes union members would approve the county’s offer, which he said was a multiyear deal that included scheduled raises and a guarantee of no furloughs or layoffs.

“This is an instance where the leadership is detached from its membership,” Mohler said of the union. “This county executive has worked day and night to protect workers in Baltimore County. Every step we’ve taken is to try to guarantee their benefits and protect their pensions.”

The dispute centers on the union’s desire for a clause that would make the contract automatically renew if a deal hasn’t been made when a current agreement expires. Its contract has long included that provision, and union members believe that means the terms of the most recent deal should still be in effect.

Local 921 President Norman Anderson said the two sides had come to an agreement this summer. But the county then told the union it wanted to remove the evergreen clause, he said.

“We’ve given them additional time to try to work things quietly out,” Anderson said. “After eight months of negotiations, when we thought we had an agreement, they added a new twist to the mix.”

Without the evergreen language, workers “are stuck in a take-it-or-leave it position,” said Genovese.

The union’s complaint states that this summer, the county “began to implement unilateral changes and to ignore the obligations of [the contract] and to ignore established practices.” For instance, the county revoked Anderson’s full-time union leave and stopped using the employees’ overtime to calculate pension benefits, according to the complaint.

Additionally, the county has been filling positions with employees who work 39 hours a week and cannot join the union, Genovese said.

The county has reached labor agreements with the other five unions that represent county workers, Mohler said.

 

City Fire Department Implements New Social Media Policy

Union leaders, experts say provisions infringe on First Amendment rights

By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun

7:10 PM EDT, November 1, 2012

The Baltimore Fire Department has implemented a strict new social media policy for what firefighters can post on Twitter, Facebook and personal blogs — drawing criticism that the department is trampling on First Amendment rights.

Under the policy, department personnel can be reprimanded for anything they write online about their jobs that doesn’t adhere to conduct rules, which require “good judgment” and “courtesy and respect to the public and to fellow employees.” The policy also restricts them from sharing information about fire scenes.

Fire Chief James S. Clack said the department crafted the policy to protect firefighters from getting into trouble for sharing sensitive information.

But union leaders called the policy too broad and said the department created it unilaterally after negotiations with union attorneys broke down last month. Social media and free-speech advocates balked at the scope of the policy and questioned its legality.

Bradley Shear, a Bethesda attorney who has advised state legislators in Annapolis on social media policy, said the new provisions are “troubling” and potentially unconstitutional.

“I think the policy is clearly suspect,” Shear said. “It’s over-broad, it’s retroactive, and I think they need to go back to the drawing board.”

Clack initiated the drafting of the new policy this spring after fire personnel took to Twitter and other social media sites to grumble about department and city leaders and the decision to close fire companies to save money.

Clack said he observed some firefighters and officers “crossing the line” by posting sensitive and often incorrect information about fire calls, including some where first responders were still on the scene.

But firefighters said they believe their online criticisms of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Clack and other city officials following the company closures actually prompted the crackdown.

The new policy applies to online chatter even if the firefighters post anonymously, and regardless of whether they are off duty. While on duty, firefighters are specifically barred from commenting online about “matters of public concern.”

Fire personnel are also prohibited from posting online “in such a way as to cause actual or reasonably foreseeable harm or disruption to the operations of the BCFD or the City.” That would include sharing “the real-time public disclosure of locations of deployed units, assets or personnel or any other real-time information from an incident scene.”

In addition, individual fire units can no longer maintain independent websites outlining their work in the communities they serve, and firefighters can no longer photograph or record images of department property without express permission.

David L. Hudson, a scholar at the First Amendment Center at Vanderbilt University who has written about public employees’ social media rights, said the department’s new policy generally “strikes a good balance between protecting free-speech rights and protecting the department.” But, he said, the policy’s “breadth” raises concerns.

Prohibiting online speech that doesn’t show good judgment is too broad because it “could be interpreted to be anything they don’t like,” Hudson said.

Clack said the purpose is not to keep personnel in lock step with department leaders but to “avoid some of the problems that have cropped up across the country and even here in Maryland with firefighters posting things that get them in trouble.”

This summer, several members of the Bel Air Volunteer Fire Company in Harford County were suspended or demoted after they complained on Facebook about not receiving a discount at a local restaurant and joked about not responding to emergency calls there.

“It’s all kind of evolving in fire service and in police departments as well,” Clack said of social media policy.

In Philadelphia, firefighters and union leaders publicly decried a new policy restricting firefighters’ use of social media, including Facebook and Twitter. The department issued a four-page memo outlining the policy in August.

The Philadelphia and Baltimore policies are similar. Both restrict the use of fire department imagery and sharing information about emergency calls, and ban members from making discriminatory remarks online about race, religion and other personal characteristics.

The two departments also restrict the use of electronic devices on the job. The new Baltimore policy says firefighters cannot use personal mobile devices at fire scenes unless they have permission, and bans them from using cameras any time on the job.

The Baltimore Police Department had been in the process of creating a new social media policy as well, but that effort has been tabled as the new Commissioner Anthony W. Batts transitions into his role.

The new Fire Department policy applies not just to social media platforms like Facebook but also to chat rooms, online forums and all forms of “electronic communication” other than personal email services and private messaging functions. But the department will not routinely monitor social media accounts of firefighters, the policy states.

Hudson, the First Amendment scholar, said he appreciated that department officials “recognize employers shouldn’t be the social media police and go around snooping at employees’ social media.”

State law bans employers from asking for employees’ social media user names and passwords.

Michael Campbell, president of the fire officers union, said the new policy infringes on First Amendment rights and doesn’t reflect many of the changes recommended by the unions before negotiations ended.

“The fire department said, ‘We’re going to do what we want to do. It’s our way or the highway,'” Campbell said.

“The fire department is definitely overreaching,” he added. “They’re just throwing the kitchen sink out there and seeing what they can get away with.”

Clack said department attorneys and the unions went “back and forth for months” on the policy, and the department did incorporate many suggestions from the unions. But eventually, both parties agreed they were not going to reach a consensus, and the department decided to move forward, he said.

“I think in the end, the unions felt like they couldn’t support a policy 100 percent, because a lot of their members use social media,” Clack said.

Clack acknowledged the policy’s far-reaching scope but said he will take a more narrow approach to enforcing it. He noted: “It’s certainly not my intent to fire anybody.”

“Attorneys, when they get a hold of this stuff, try to throw everything in and cover every base, but I’m going to be most interested in people when they’re working,” he said.

Shear, the social media attorney, said one of the most troubling aspects of the policy is that it’s retroactive.

Union contracts prevent the department from punishing employees for actions after a certain amount of time has passed, but Shear said the language of the policy could be understood to allow the department’s good judgment standard to be applied to social media posts made years ago. “It essentially holds you accountable for things in the past, including things you might not be proud of in college or high school,” Shear said.

“You’ve got to be careful regulating speech with public employees, and the way the policy is written, it appears to violate the principles of free speech,” Shear said.

“F” Time Credit While County Government is Closed (Revised)

Be advised Baltimore County Government will close its offices at 1 p.m October 29, 2012 for weather related reasons.

The Offices will remain closed until 5 a.m. on October 31, 2012. Emergency/essential employees are required to remain at work and to come to work for their normally scheduled shifts.

The Memorandum of Understanding:
Article 9, Section 9.12: Additional Leave Provision
In the event the County Administration closes all Baltimore County Offices for normal business, those employees who are required to remain at work or to come to work during the hours the County offices are closed shall be marked as present and credited with “F” time for official non-work day, for the hours actually worked during their regularly scheduled shift.

Member should receive “F” time for those hours actually worked during their regular shift during up until 5am on October 31, 2012.

Funeral arrangements for PFC. Kevin Bowden #3087

The funeral arrangements for Police Officer First Class Kevin Bowden #3087 are as follows:

Viewing:
Lee’s Funeral Home
6633 Old Alexandria Ferry Rd
Clinton, Maryland 20735
Date: Friday, October 26, 2012
Time: 6-8 pm

Memorial Services/Second Viewing:
Saint Stephen’s Baptist Church
5757 Temple Hill Rd
Temple Hills, Maryland 20748
Date: Saturday, October 27, 2012
Viewing: 9-11 am (public)
Service: 11-1230 pm

The Interment will immediately follow the memorial service.

Interment:
Mount Olivet Cemetery
1300 Bladensburg Rd NE
Washington, DC 20002

Repast:
Saint Stephen’s Baptist Church
5757 Temple Hill Rd
Temple Hills, Maryland 20748

Uniform: Class ‘’A” uniform to include 8 point cover
No mourning band/gloves authorized

Any inquiries can be made to the District IV Commander’s office at 301-749-4910.

S/A Captain D. Garrett #1967, Acting Commander, District IV

Baltimore County: ruling in EEOC case could mean increased pension contributions

County vows to fight judge’s decision “until there is no one left to fight”

By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun

7:12 PM EDT, October 23, 2012

Baltimore County officials say thousands of workers could be forced to contribute more to their pensions after a federal judge ruled that the county retirement system discriminates against beneficiaries based on age.

The county vowed Tuesday to “aggressively” fight the court decision, which the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission announced this week. U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg ruled that the county pension system violates the federal Age Discrimination in Employment Act because older workers were required to pay more for their retirement benefits than younger ones.

The court has not yet determined damages in the case. Still, Don Mohler, chief of staff to County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, said costs to the county could total millions of dollars and employees could “have to make up the difference.”

“If this judge’s ruling is to stand, he will be taking money out of the pockets of county employees,” Mohler said.

The county is reviewing legal options and is “prepared to aggressively defend its position, all the way to the Supreme Court if we have to,” Mohler said. “We will fight this case until there is no one left to fight, to protect our employees.”

EEOC regional attorney Debra M. Lawrence said in a statement that the commission “will litigate the case in the Court, not in the media.”

In a blog post published on the county website Tuesday, county budget and finance director Keith Dorsey wrote that the EEOC “misstates and distorts the County’s retirement program. …” About 8,000 employees could have to pay more to their retirement benefits, he wrote.

“Baltimore County’s retirement contribution schedule is not discriminatory, was negotiated by County labor groups, and is supported by years of sound actuarial studies,” Dorsey wrote.

The county’s $2 billion retirement system covers about 9,000 active employees and 6,000 retirees. In 2007, the county changed its system so that employees hired after July 1 of that year contribute at a flat rate not based on their age.

The EEOC sued the county that year on behalf of workers hired before 2007. Two years later, the county prevailed in court, but the EEOC appealed and the case was returned.

Any changes to the contribution rates of unionized county employees would have to be negotiated, according to employee-benefits lawyers and county labor leaders. The county’s unions were also named as defendants by the EEOC.

Baltimore County Professional Fire Fighters Association President Mike Day said he believes the judge’s decision could ultimately hurt county employees.

“The money’s going have to come from somewhere,” said Day, who also serves on the retirement system’s board of trustees. “If the money has to come from Baltimore County’s coffers, then that’s less money that Baltimore County’s going to have to negotiate another raise.”

But Baltimore County Federation of Public Employees President John Ripley said the county’s public comments on the case amounted to blaming workers for its legal troubles.

“Enough’s enough,” Ripley said. “We didn’t set the contribution rates. … County employees are no more responsible for this than the residents that elected the county officials to run the government.”

County Vows to Take Pension Case to the Supreme Court

County officials say they will take a recent federal court ruling on contribution rates charged by the pension system “all the way to the Supreme Court.”

The vow to appeal the ruling comes less than a day after the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunities Commission announced a federal judge had declared that the county’s pension contribution rates are discriminatory.

“We’re going to fight this until there is no one else to fight,” said Don Mohler, a county spokesman.

Mohler said the Oct. 17 decision by U.S. District Court Judge Benson Everett Legg could have dire consequences for more than 6,000 employees.

“If this judge is allowed to prevail, and we don’t think he will, we’ll have to go back to more than 6,000 employees and arbitrarily raise the contribution rates and take money out of their pockets,” Mohler said.

The ruling wouldn’t just change the contribution rates for employees moving forward. Employees would also be required to pay additional money into the system to cover the difference between the contributions made since the change was instituted in July 2007.

The changes were part of an overhaul designed to protect the financial health of the nearly $2 billion Baltimore County Employees Retirement System.

Employees hired after that date contributed to their pensions at a flat rate regardless of their age at the time of their hiring. Employees hired before that date paid into the system at a rate based on their age.

“Two employees with the same number of years until retirement eligibility—that is, the same pension status—do not necessarily contribute at the same rate,” Legg wrote in his 10-page ruling. “Pension status, therefore, cannot be the driving factor behind the disparate treatment, which is directly linked to an employee’s age. As such, because age is the ‘but-for’ cause of the disparate treatment, the ERS violates the [Age Discrimination in Employment Act].”

“Millions and millions of dollars would have to be repaid,” said Mohler.

Mohler said the county believes the ruling is “part of a pattern.”

“There is a drumbeat to have public employees move away from traditional retirement plans and into 401Ks,” said Mohler.

“We believe we have an obligation to provide benefits to our employees that are sustainable,” said Mohler.

“Everything we do is designed to protect employees and protect the [retirement] system,” said Mohler.

Bryan Sears

Judge rules that Balt. Co. pension system discriminates based on age

By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun

1:51 PM EDT, October 22, 2012

A federal judge has ruled that Baltimore County’s pension system discriminates against beneficiaries because older workers were required to pay more toward their retirement than younger workers.

U.S. District Judge Benson Everett Legg sided with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, finding that the county system violates the Age Discrimination in Employment Act.

The EEOC, which announced the decision today, sued the county in 2007 on behalf of two retired corrections officers. At the time, the plan covered 9,500 active employees and 6,600 retirees.

The county changed its pension system in 2007 so that workers hired after July 1, 2007 contributed to the retirement system at a flat rate not based on their age at hiring. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of employees hired before that date.

Damages have not yet been determined in the case, said Maria Salacuse, supervisory trial attorney with the EEOC’s Baltimore office.

In 2009, the court ruled in favor of the county, but the EEOC appealed.

A county spokesman could not immediately be reached for comment.

In a statement, EEOC regional attorney Debra Lawrence said the county provided no financial justification for the practice.

“Older employees felt the impact of this discrimination in every paycheck,” she said. “Because more money is taken out of older employees’ paychecks to fund their retirement benefits, they receive less pay than younger employees doing the same job. With the court’s decision, we are putting an end to this unlawful practice.”