Class Grievance for Police Officer Part-Time Has Been Resolved

On October 5, the FOP filed a class grievance against Chief Sheridan and Baltimore County Office of Human Resources after they posted a job opening for the position of Police Officer Part-Time on the county website. The listing also contained a salary and job description. These items have to be negotiated with the FOP.  A request to bargain also was sent to Chief Sheridan.

The Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Baltimore County Government and the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #4 (FOP), specifically article 1 section 1.2 “Employee Defined” states “Whenever used in this MOU, the term “employee” shall mean all sworn personnel up to and including the rank of Lieutenant of the Police Department.”

Furthermore, article 1 section 1.1 “Union Recognition” states “The Administration recognizes the FOP as the exclusive representative of its employees as defined in Section in Section 1.2 of this article with respect to wages, hours and other terms and conditions of employment.”

Through the Police Officer Part Time position, the Department and the County are altering the negotiated terms and conditions of employment. It would also cause those hired in the position of part time police officer to be unrepresented should they be accused of any wrongdoing or sustain any liability.

On October 19, 2017, Chief Sheridan issued a correspondence denying the grievance and refusing to bargain.

Our appeal to step #3 was promptly filed with the Office of Administrative Hearings. That hearing was scheduled for November 1, 2017 at 1:30pm.

On October 30, 2017, Chief Sheridan issued a correspondence rescinding the position of “part-time police officer”. The posting has also been removed from the county website.

On October 31, 2017, President Weston responded in a correspondence to Chief Sheridan and the Office of Administrative Hearings that the FOP was withdrawing its request to bargain and the class grievance.

Congratulations to all on your promotion

On Friday, September 29, the Baltimore County Police Department held a promotional ceremony for the ranks of Colonel and Major at the Vista Room, 2200 York Road, 21093.

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, Baltimore County Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan, and other local government representatives will be in attendance to congratulate the officers on their new assignments.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments.

  • Major Steven M. Hlavach will be promoted to the rank of Colonel and assigned to the Criminal Investigation Bureau.
  • Captain Andre K. Davis will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Criminal Information and Analysis Division.
  • Captain David J. Folderauer will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Operations Bureau, Western Patrol Division.
  • Captain Jay C. Landsman Jr. will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Technical Services Division.
  • Captain Robert O. McCullough will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Operations Bureau, Executive Officer.
  • Captain John J. McGann will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Criminal Investigations Bureau.
  • Captain James P. Monahan will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Internal Affairs Section.

Jurors acquit Baltimore County police officer accused of kicking, spitting on a suspect

After deliberating for about 30 minutes Thursday, a Baltimore County jury acquitted a police officer accused of unlawfully kicking and spitting on a suspect during an arrest that was captured on video by a city police helicopter.

A group of jurors then waited outside the Towson courthouse to thank the officer, Christopher M. Spivey, for his service.

“It was hands down he was innocent,” said Cindy Blanchard, 51, of White Marsh.

Spivey, in turn, thanked the jurors.

Spivey, 29, was charged with four counts of second-degree assault, each carrying up to 10 years in prison, for allegedly kicking 20-year-old Diamontae Tyquan Farrar, who led police on a lengthy car chase in a stolen car on Jan. 25 and then fled on foot. Spivey was the first officer to catch up to Farrar.

A Baltimore police helicopter assisting in the pursuit captured the incident on video. The state’s attorney’s office alleged Spivey used excessive force, kicking Farrar as he got on the ground to surrender, and two more times as he was being handcuffed. Spivey was also accused of spitting on Farrar as he lay handcuffed on the ground.

Spivey said on the stand Wednesday that he feared Farrar might be armed, leading him to make a quick decision to run toward him and kick him to keep him from reaching for a possible gun or other weapon.

In closing arguments, Deputy State’s Attorney Robin S. Coffin questioned why the kicking wasn’t documented by police if it was necessary to arrest Farrar.

Spivey also denied spitting on the man.

Over three days of testimony, the state and the defense repeatedly showed the video captured by the city police helicopter that assisted in the chase. Two Baltimore officers, Edward Nero and John Bilheimer, testified that they were concerned about the video and felt compelled to report it to their supervisors. Nero was one of the six Baltimore police officers charged in the 2015 arrest and death of Freddie Gray. Nero was acquitted last year, though he still faces a departmental hearing in that case.

Spivey’s attorneys made a point to slow the video down for jurors and give commentary.

“When you slow the video down, you can actually see what happened,” Blanchard, one of the jurors, said afterward.

The defense also called Charles “Joe” Key, an expert in police policy and procedures, who testified that Spivey acted as any “reasonable” officer would.

Another juror, Patty Wise, of Lansdowne said “I am very proud of this officer. He did what he was trained to do.”

Dr. Anand Dutta, 40, a physician from Cockeysville who also was on the panel, said jurors moved quickly after agreeing that the state lacked evidence. Dutta said the video of the incident provided an incomplete picture and that information from the officers on the scene was needed to get the full story. The defense called other officers at the scene who said they did not see Spivey spit on Farrar.

Spivey was suspended with pay for nine months before the trial and still faces an internal investigation.

“We certainly hope that in the future, [the state’s attorney’s office] will investigate these matters more thoroughly before they charge a good cop like Chris Spivey,” said his attorney, Brian Thompson.

He said the state’s attorney’s office wrongly based their investigation on a single video and cautioned that the rush to charge Spivey could deter county police officers from doing their job.

“I think we’ve all seen what’s happened in Baltimore City since the Freddie Gray case. The police have stopped policing, and who could blame them,” Thompson said.

David Rose, second vice president for the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4, expressed similar concerns, and said the state’s attorney’s office wil have to “regain some confidence with the troops at large.”

Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger defended his office’s actions in pursuing the case against Spivey.

“We felt like we had sufficient evidence based on the video alone,” he said.

Shellenberger said his office carefully evaluates cases involving officers.

“I take my responsibility to police the police very seriously,” he said. “Only twice in 10 years have we prosecuted a police officer for a crime. I think it’s a very important aspect of our job. I believe I owe it to the public in the cases that we think are sufficient to go forward to go forward.”

Spivey appeared relieved after the verdict, and hugged his attorneys in the courtroom. Outside, he thanked jurors for returning a favorable verdict.

They “very delicately looked at each of the facts and testimony,” he said.

Farrar was convicted of theft and attempting to elude police in the incident. He received a three-year sentence last month.

jkanderson@baltsun.com

twitter.com/janders5

FOP Lodge #4 wins the article 6.1c grievance in arbitration

Below is the arbitration award and correction letter for the article 6.1c grievance (me too clause).  In the original award on page 6, the arbitrator refers to “Montgomery County Labor Commissioner”. That is later corrected in a letter from the arbitrator.

The FOP will attempt to begin communication with the County to implement the award.

Arbitration award of Salvatore Arrigo

arbitration correction

 

Baltimore County prosecutors rule fatal Catonsville shooting by off-duty officer justified

Baltimore County prosecutors have ruled that the fatal shooting of a 35-year-old man by an off-duty officer outside a Catonsville Giant store this month was legally justified.

County State’s Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger announced the decision Monday and released surveillance footage from the grocery store at U.S. 40 and Rolling Road.

On Aug. 1, an off-duty officer, who has been identified only as Officer 1st Class McCain of the Parkville precinct, was working security at the store when he confronted Christopher E. Clapp, who was suspected of shoplifting, in the parking lot, police have said.

According to police, Clapp began driving away, dragging McCain.

In the video released Monday, Clapp’s car is seen coming into view with the officer partially seen next to the driver’s side door. As the vehicle comes to a stop, the officer is seen falling to the ground and then getting up. It is not clear from the video exactly when McCain shot Clapp.

In a letter to the police department released Monday, Deputy State’s Attorney Robin S. Coffin wrote that she had reviewed surveillance footage from the Giant, statements from several eyewitnesses, and the statement of the officer. She wrote that McCain reached into the car “to affect the arrest,” and that Clapp then accelerated and began dragging the officer. McCain “repeatedly ordered Mr. Clapp to stop the car,” she wrote.

“At this point, Officer McCain was reasonably in fear that he would be continually dragged by the car or run over by the car,” Coffin wrote. “Officer McCain was justified in shooting Mr. Clapp to save his own life.”

Under an agreement with the police union, the department does not release the first names of officers involved in shootings.

McCain, a 16-year veteran of the department, was not injured in the incident. A passenger in Clapp’s vehicle was not shot but was taken to the hospital with chest pains after the shooting, according to police.

The officer has been returned to regular duty, a police spokesman, Cpl. Shawn Vinson, said.

Prosecutors released other footage Monday that included scenes from inside the store.

Clapp’s brother said his family still has questions about the case. He said the family had seen some of the surveillance footage, but not all of it.

“The history of this country has shown us that those in power can make determinations and it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the whole truth,” Justin Clapp said.

Christopher Clapp grew up in North Carolina and moved to the Baltimore area this past fall, his brother has said. He previously had lived in the area to attend Towson University.

The case has led County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to call for a review of the body camera policy for officers who work second jobs. The department currently doesn’t require officers who moonlight as security guards in their county uniforms to use body cameras.

County police began to phase in body cameras last year, and McCain had not yet been given a camera, according to the department. All uniformed patrol officers are scheduled to have the cameras by Oct. 1.

Shellenberger said that the surveillance video in this case corroborated statements made to investigators by the officer and witnesses, who included a truck driver, a cashier and a customer.

Police records show Christopher Clapp had another encounter with county police a few days before he was killed. On July 29, a patrol officer said he saw a man being chased by an employee of Nikki’s Liquors in the 7500 block of Belair Road. The man tried to get into a vehicle driven by Clapp, and then got out of the vehicle and placed four liquor bottles on the ground. The man was arrested at the scene and charged.

An officer wrote that he asked the driver, later identified as Clapp, to turn off the vehicle.

“He complied then restarted the car and sped off the lot almost causing a collision,” the officer wrote.

Police were planning to charge Clapp with “aiding in the theft and committing several traffic violations,” according to the police report.

McCain has been involved in one previous shooting. In 2006, he was one of two officers who shot at a carjacking suspect who police say drove toward officers. The man survived and the shooting was ruled justified.

Alisonk@baltsun.com

 

 

Officer Dragged by Suspect Vehicle, Shoots Kills Suspect

Baltimore County Police continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding a police-involved shooting early this morning at the Giant grocery store in Catonsville.

Just before 4 a.m. police responded to the 6000 block of Baltimore National Pike after an off-duty, uniformed Baltimore County Police Officer, working secondary employment at Giant, shot and killed a fleeing suspect as the officer was being dragged by the suspect vehicle over 100 feet across the parking lot.

The suspect previously entered the Giant store with canvas grocery bags and filled them with merchandise, including household items such as laundry detergent. The officer watched the suspect walk past all working registers with the bags of merchandise, making no attempt to pay for the items before exiting the store. The officer quickly confirmed with an employee that the suspect had not paid for the items he’d taken, then followed the suspect outside of the store where he saw him get into the driver’s seat of a Lincoln vehicle with a North Carolina registration plate waiting on the parking lot.

The officer approached the driver side window and verbally engaged the suspect, who responded by putting the car’s gear into drive. The officer reached into the vehicle, ordering the suspect to stop the vehicle multiple times, but the suspect rapidly accelerated, squealing the vehicle’s tires on the pavement and speeding away, dragging the officer with the vehicle. Witnesses heard the officer telling the driver to stop multiple times.  The officer drew his service weapon and fired shots into the vehicle at the suspect, killing the suspect and stopping the vehicle.  The deceased suspect’s identity is not being released until notification of next of kin.

An adult male who was in the front seat of the suspect’s Lincoln at the time of the incident was unharmed, but taken to an area hospital for treatment of chest pains following the incident. He has given police an account of the events that is consistent with the accounts of other independent witnesses at the scene and surveillance video obtained from the Giant store.  The Giant grocery store video will be made available at a later time.

Police determined that the Lincoln was not currently registered but was displaying a North Carolina tag registered to a Subaru. Police are still investigating to determine how the suspect came into possession of the Lincoln, which is not currently reported stolen.

While the officer was wearing his Baltimore County Police issued uniform, he was not equipped with a body-worn camera. The body-worn camera policy does not require it be worn with the uniform if an officer is working in a secondary employment capacity.

Per the agreement with the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #4, the officer involved in the shooting will not be identified at this time. The Homicide Unit investigates all police-involved shootings. Once the investigation is complete, the incident will be reviewed by the Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Office. The Baltimore County Firearms Discharge Review Board also examines every shot fired by police for compliance with agency policy. As standard procedure, the officer will be placed on administrative status during this process.

Seven Officers to Be Promoted

On August 2, seven Baltimore County police officers will be promoted. The 1 p.m. ceremony will take place at George Washington Carver Center for the Arts and Technology, 938 York Road, Towson 21204. Congratulations to all for their hard work!!

Chief Terrence B. Sheridan and County Executive Kevin Kamenetz will speak at the ceremony and present the certificates. The oath of office will be administered by Julie Ensor, Clerk of the Court, and Reverend Herbert Watson Jr. will offer the invocation and benediction.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments:

  • Sergeant Brian A. Edwards is promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Corporal Dennis H. Kohajda is promoted to the rank of Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 11/Essex.
  • Corporal Marianne L. Snyder is promoted to the rank of Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 9/White Marsh.
  • Corporal David J. Sweren is promoted to the rank of Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Officer Jeremy W. Fumia is promoted to the rank of Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Officer Stuart H. Grantham is promoted to the rank of Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 9/White Marsh.
  • Officer Ernest J. Hannig is promoted to the rank of Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 3/Franklin.

Internal charges dismissed against Baltimore County officer accused of excessive force

A Baltimore County police officer who was scheduled to go before the department’s first public trial board Monday will instead return to work after internal charges against him were dismissed this week.

Police Chief Terry Sheridan dismissed the charges against Officer Ernest Hannig, who faced termination after an internal affairs investigation concluded that he used excessive force when he used a Taser on a Rosedale man last June.

Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said in an email that Sheridan consulted with the department’s legal affairs section before he “dismissed the charges in the interest of justice and fairness after additional information came to light.”

Armacost declined to elaborate, saying the department does not comment on personnel matters. She also said Sheridan declined to comment on the case.

Hannig’s attorney, Michael L. Marshall, called the charges “baseless.”

“I wish this happened sooner. I give credit to Chief Sheridan,” Marshall said Friday.

He criticized the department’s internal affairs unit “for letting it get to this.”

An internal investigation concluded that Hannig used excessive force and lied on an incident report after an incident involving Charles Chapman.

On June 16, 2016, Hannig was called to the Rosedale area, where witnesses reported Chapman was disrobing on a ramp from U.S. 40 onto the Baltimore Beltway.

Hannig said the man’s behavior changed from being “highly aggressive to being relatively calm and catatonic,” and that he used his Taser because Chapman began to walk toward him with clenched fists, according to a disciplinary report on the incident.

A supervisor who later reviewed Taser camera video of the incident said Hannig “embellished the actions of Mr. Chapman in order to justify a use of force that was out of policy,” and recommended his termination.

Marshall disputed the department’s contention that Hannig lied. He said Hannig felt Chapman was coming at him, which was reflected in the video. He also noted that Hannig was aware that the incident was being recorded and would be reviewed.

During the internal investigation, Hannig was suspended with pay and lost his police powers.

Before the charges were dismissed, he had been scheduled to go before the trial board, a three-member panel made up of a commander, a lieutenant and a person of the same rank as the accused, which can make its own recommendations to the police chief.

Armacost said Hannig, a 15-year veteran of the department, remains assigned to the mobile crisis unit. The unit pairs a mental health clinician with officers for calls involving people with known or suspected mental health issues.

“He’s obviously glad to be going to work,” Marshall said of Hannig.

Chapman was not seriously injured in the incident, Marshall said. He was taken to a hospital to have the Taser prongs removed and was not charged in the incident.

Neither Chapman nor his family could be reached for comment.

jkanderson@baltsun.com

twitter.com/janders5

Dundalk Gunman who shot at police had extensive police record

The gunman killed in a Wednesday shootout in Dundalk had an open warrant in Pennsylvania and was prohibited from possessing firearms because of a previous conviction, Baltimore County police said Thursday.

Police identified the gunman Thursday as 35-year-old Blaine Robert Erb, of no fixed address. Erb was killed by police during the exchange of gunfire, which also left a bystander wounded and a police officer in serious condition.

Authorities identified the wounded officer as Officer First Class Slocum, a 13-year veteran of the county police. She was shot twice in the lower body and remains in serious condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Baltimore County police do not publicly release the full names of officers in these cases, citing an agreement with the police union.

The bystander, a 21-year-old Baltimore woman, suffered a gunshot wound and is expected to survive, police said. Her name also was not released, and police had not determined who shot her.

Officers responded to the 3400 block of Dundalk Ave. near Avon Beach Road at 2:49 p.m. Wednesday for a report of an armed robbery in progress, police said. At the scene they learned a man — later identified as Erb — ran onto a nearby No. 10 Maryland Transit Administration bus. Police said Erb had robbed two people at gunpoint before the shooting began.

When officers stopped the bus near the Logan Village Shopping Center about a block away and confronted Erb, he opened fire, they said. The incident culminated in a shootout that left Erb dead on a nearby lawn.

Police said Thursday that four officers had fired their weapons at Erb. The officers, whose names have not been released, were placed on routine administrative leave. At least one officer was wearing a body camera, police said, but all visual and audio recordings will not yet be released because they are part of the investigation.

Investigators found two .40-caliber handguns next to Erb’s body, as well as gun magazines and ammunition. Police said they are looking into where Erb obtained the firearms.

Police said Erb’s previous charges have included robbery, weapon violations, assault and theft. There was also a bench warrant for Erb in York County, Pa., for failure to appear on DUI charges, county police spokeswoman Officer Jennifer Peach said.

Online court records indicate that Erb pleaded guilty in 2012 in Anne Arundel County to a charge of possessing contraband in jail. He pleaded guilty in 2011 in Somerset County to second-degree assault. In Baltimore County in 2003, Erb pleaded guilty to attempted robbery, court records show.

By Michael Brice-Saddler

and Carrie Wells

The Baltimore Sun

Baltimore Sun reporter Alison Knezevich contributed to this article.

mbricesaddler@baltsun.com

@TheArtist_MBS

Congratulations to all on their promotion

On May 25 at 1 p.m., six Baltimore County police officers will be promoted. The ceremony will take place in the Vista Room at Timonium Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium 21093.

Chief Terrence B. Sheridan will speak at the ceremony and present the certificates. The oath of office will be administered by the Honorable Julie Ensor, Clerk for Baltimore County. The invocation and benediction will be offered by the Reverend Darron D. McKinney Sr., a police chaplain.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments.

  • Sergeant Keith Fruhling is promoted to Lieutenant and is assigned to Precinct 11 Essex.
  • Corporal Thomas Morehouse is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 9 White Marsh.
  • Corporal James Gill is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 11 Essex.
  • Officer Melinda Mori is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 4 Pikesville.
  • Officer Jessica Beale is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 1 Wilkens.
  • Officer Eric Brennan is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 8 Parkvill

Baltimore County police shooting in Parkville area ruled justified

Baltimore County prosecutors have ruled that a police officer was justified in shooting a man in the Parkville area in April, citing evidence including body camera footage.

In a letter Tuesday to the Police Department, Deputy State’s Attorney Robin Coffin wrote that the officer acted “for his own safety.”

The officer, who shot 27-year-old Brandon Smith on April 12, has been identified only by his last name, in keeping with an agreement between the county and the police union.

“Officer Downs clearly identified himself as a Police Officer and demanded that Smith not move and keep his hands visible,” Coffin wrote in the letter, adding that Smith was “clearly going for his handgun.”

“Keep your hands up,” Downs says in the video. “Keep your hands up, boy.”

Smith then turns as he bends down toward the ground.

“Drop the gun!” Downs says before shooting.

In the video, an object that appears to be a gun is visible on the ground near Smith.

Downs, who was hired in 2013, has returned to duty, a police spokeswoman said.

The Police Department launched its $12.5 million body camera program last July. It has gradually given the devices to officers and plans to have body cameras on 1,435 officers by the end of September.

The county’s decision not to publicly release camera footage of police shootings has been criticized by groups including the ACLU of Maryland.

alisonk@baltsun.com

twitter.com/aliknez

Copyright © 2017, The Baltimore Sun, a Baltimore Sun Media Group publication

Police chief defends withholding of videos

Baltimore County Police Chief Terry Sheridan is defending the decision not to release videos from recent incidents in which county officers have shot suspects.

At a meeting Tuesday in Arbutus with a community relations group for the county’s Wilkens Precinct, Sheridan called the county body-camera initiative a “good program,” but said he supports State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger’s position not to release video until the conclusion of a trial.

County police have shot six people in four separate incidents since January. Two people died in those incidents.

Body cameras captured elements of all the incidents, but police have made the videos public in only one case. Officials have said either that they are still investigating the other shootings or that prosecutors have told them the footage will likely be used as evidence in trials.

Sheridan said not releasing footage helps ensure that potential jurors would not be prejudiced before a trial. He also said he believes some footage has no probative value — meaning it would not prove anything important in a trial.

“We’ve taken the position that if it’s something very graphic [and] it has no probative value, we aren’t going to release that stuff because all that’s going to do is sensationalize it,” he said.

Shellenberger has also said footage that could be used at trial should not be released to the public because of its potential impact on jurors, and that it should not be released before an investigation into a police shooting has been closed.

The department released footage of a January shooting in which an officer fatally shot 59-year-old Kerry Lee Coomer, an Overlea man police said threatened his family and raised a rifle as an officer talked to him. Officials said that footage could be released because the case did not result in charges against a suspect.

In three other incidents, footage has not been released to the public. In March, two officers investigating a store robbery in Woodlawn shot at a vehicle coming toward them, killing Rashad Daquan Opher, 20, and wounding two others.

By Jon Bleiweis

Baltimore Sun reporters Alison Knezevich and Pamela Wood contributed to this article.

Police Foundation 2017 Award Winners

The annual Baltimore County Police Foundation Awards ceremony honored nine sworn officers and four civilians for exceptional performance. The honorees included Officers Justin A. Haines, Brian D. Remmers and Phillip R. Wright who successfully settled a dangerous situation that could have been deadly.

Master of Ceremonies Stan Stovall hosted the awards dinner evening at the Delta Hotels Baltimore Hunt Valley (the former Baltimore Hunt Valley Inn), 245 Shawan Road, Hunt Valley 21031.

The following personnel received the 2017 Police Foundation Awards.

Valor – Officers Justin A. Haines, Brian D. Remmers and Phillip R. Wright, Precinct 4 Pikesville

On December 23, 2016, the officers responded to a disturbance at an apartment building. The subject was screaming and slamming his door. The subject yelled “time to die” at the officers when they knocked on his door. Within seconds, the subject, armed with a knife, opened the door and confronted Officer Haines. The officers slowly retreated as the man moved forward toward them. When Officer Haines lost his footing, Officer Remmers stepped back and un-holstered his weapon at the same time. The subject moved forward and Officer Remmers shot the man once in the shoulder. The officers kept their position and guns on the subject until it was determined there was no longer a risk.

Crime Prevention – Detective Kenneth Brown and Detective Steve Jackson, Mobile Crisis Team

As experienced detectives with the Mobile Crisis Team, Detectives Brown and Jackson created a training presentation that focused on the aspects related to workplace violence, de-escalation techniques, and responding to an active shooter. The presentation incorporates how to identify potential offenders, how to verbally de-escalate hostile and angry individuals, and how to react in order to increase survival during incidents of violence. In 2016, the detectives gave the presentation to over 2,800 people.

Distinguished Contribution to the Profession – Officer James A. Bylen, Marine Team

Officer Bylen witnessed an uptick in boating fatalities – 16 in the upper Chesapeake Bay region in 2015. Determined not to repeat the situation, Officer Bylen created an event to be held annually in conjunction with National Safe Boater Week. It was his hope that attendees would gain a better appreciation for safe boating operation. Officer Bylen met with community associations, the Baltimore County Marine Trades Association, the local civic council and the Back River Restoration Committee. With the cooperation of the U.S Coast Guard, the Department of Natural Resources, the Baltimore County Fire Department and the Baltimore County Volunteer Fire Rescue, the Annual “Sergeant Marvin T. Haw IV Safety Day” was begun.

The result of Officer Bylen’s efforts were evident in 2016. The number of drownings dropped from 16 in 2015 to six in 2016.

Exceptional Performance – Officer Jefferson F. Schaub Jr., DUI Task Force

Officer Schaub set out to apprehend 100 DUI offenders in 2016. His dedication to making the roads safer showed in the numbers. Officer Schaub conducted 37 Intoximeter Tests, and eight Drug Recognition evaluations; these tests take an average of 1-4 hours to administer. In addition, he made 557 traffic stops, issued 983 warnings, and 37 Safety Equipment Repair Orders. His tireless efforts have kept the roads safer for those driving in Baltimore County.

Exceptional Group Performance – Digital and Multimedia Evidence Unit

Ashley Hofmann, Gregory J. Klein, Christopher G. Kollmann and Dana McAlister

This unit uses a high-tech, cutting edge approach to recover, preserve and examine digital evidence. Data recovered from mobile devices and computers, and surveillance video extracted and enhanced from crime scenes and surrounding businesses provide invaluable leads that support investigations and solve crimes.

Community Service – Officer Darryl A. Hunter Sr., School Resource Officer (SRO) in Precinct 11 Essex

As SRO, mentor, teacher and guide at Chesapeake High School for 14 years, Officer Hunter has helped students find their way through tough times. When he started at the school, he met with everyone – principals, teachers and students – and has maintained a strong presence since then. His leadership and straight talk helped students who would cross the line and would discipline them as the law allows. However, the best testament to his work with young people can be counted by those who have succeeded. Several students have attended the Youth Leadership Academy, four became volunteer police explorers, three became cadets, one is in training at the academy and two are current police officers. As a coach at Chesapeake High School, Officer Hunter led the 2016 girls’ basketball team and the football team to championships.

Rookie of the Year – Officer James A. Koscielski III, Precinct 2 Woodlawn

In 2016 Officer Koscielski became a patrol officer at Precinct 2. Officer Koscielski is self-motivated and proactive. His determination led him to excel during his shift. So much so, he led the shift in enforcement and was given a permanent patrol car. The officer cleared hundreds of case and cleared 104 serious traffic cases.

During 2016, he seized about $3,000 in currency related to drug sales and seized four guns during one investigation.

His leadership skills have made him a valuable part of the department.

Congratulations to all on their promotion!

On April 10 at 1 p.m., 18 Baltimore County police officers will be promoted. The ceremony will take place at Loch Raven High School, 1212 Cowpens Avenue, Towson, Md. 21286.

Chief Terrence B. Sheridan will speak at the ceremony and present the certificates. The oath of office will be administered by the Honorable Julie Ensor, Clerk for Baltimore County. The invocation and benediction will be offered the Reverend Herbert Watson Jr., a police chaplain.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments.

  • Sergeant Matthew T. Jackson is promoted to Lieutenant and is assigned to the Operations Bureau.
  • Sergeant John M. Keeney is promoted to Lieutenant and is assigned to Precinct 2/Woodlawn.
  • Sergeant Christopher P. Morgan is promoted to Lieutenant and is assigned to the Operations Bureau
  • Corporal Steven M.Ellingsworth is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 11/Essex.
  • Corporal Sundia Gaynor is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 1/Wilkens.
  • Corporal Doug C.Jess is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 2/Woodlawn.
  • Corporal Robert Vicosa is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Corporal Robert M.Walsh is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 1/Wilkens.
  • Corporal Matthew W. Wilking is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Corporal Kyle J.Woodward is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 4/Pikesville.
  • Officer Joseph Barresi is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 11/Essex.
  • Officer Christopher D.Cullip is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 7/Cockeysville.
  • Officer Greg A.Czajkowski is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to the Operations Bureau.
  • Officer Pearin D. Holt II is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 6/Towson.
  • Officer Gregory N. Huber is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 1/Wilkens.
  • Officer Bruce W. Kindervater Jr. is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 11/Essex.
  • Officer Michael A. Lyon is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 8/Parkville.
  • Officer Michael B. Salamone is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 4/Pikesville.

Income Tax Subtraction Modification – Retirement Income of Law Enforcement

The Senate voted 47-0 in favor of HB100 – $15,000 Income Tax Subtraction Modification – Retirement Income of Law Enforcement, Fire, Rescue, and Emergency Services Personnel.

It now awaits the Governor’s signature. This has been a long hard fight for years. Their are too many to thank personally. On behalf of the men and women of the Maryland Fraternal Order of Police we thank you all!!!!