Congratulations to all on your promotion

On Friday, September 29, the Baltimore County Police Department held a promotional ceremony for the ranks of Colonel and Major at the Vista Room, 2200 York Road, 21093.

Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz, Baltimore County Police Chief Terrence B. Sheridan, and other local government representatives will be in attendance to congratulate the officers on their new assignments.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments.

  • Major Steven M. Hlavach will be promoted to the rank of Colonel and assigned to the Criminal Investigation Bureau.
  • Captain Andre K. Davis will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Criminal Information and Analysis Division.
  • Captain David J. Folderauer will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Operations Bureau, Western Patrol Division.
  • Captain Jay C. Landsman Jr. will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Technical Services Division.
  • Captain Robert O. McCullough will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Operations Bureau, Executive Officer.
  • Captain John J. McGann will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Criminal Investigations Bureau.
  • Captain James P. Monahan will be promoted to the rank of Major and is assigned to the Internal Affairs Section.

Employment Opportunity: Police Officer UMBC

Job opening

 

Jurors acquit Baltimore County police officer accused of kicking, spitting on a suspect

After deliberating for about 30 minutes Thursday, a Baltimore County jury acquitted a police officer accused of unlawfully kicking and spitting on a suspect during an arrest that was captured on video by a city police helicopter.

A group of jurors then waited outside the Towson courthouse to thank the officer, Christopher M. Spivey, for his service.

“It was hands down he was innocent,” said Cindy Blanchard, 51, of White Marsh.

Spivey, in turn, thanked the jurors.

Spivey, 29, was charged with four counts of second-degree assault, each carrying up to 10 years in prison, for allegedly kicking 20-year-old Diamontae Tyquan Farrar, who led police on a lengthy car chase in a stolen car on Jan. 25 and then fled on foot. Spivey was the first officer to catch up to Farrar.

A Baltimore police helicopter assisting in the pursuit captured the incident on video. The state’s attorney’s office alleged Spivey used excessive force, kicking Farrar as he got on the ground to surrender, and two more times as he was being handcuffed. Spivey was also accused of spitting on Farrar as he lay handcuffed on the ground.

Spivey said on the stand Wednesday that he feared Farrar might be armed, leading him to make a quick decision to run toward him and kick him to keep him from reaching for a possible gun or other weapon.

In closing arguments, Deputy State’s Attorney Robin S. Coffin questioned why the kicking wasn’t documented by police if it was necessary to arrest Farrar.

Spivey also denied spitting on the man.

Over three days of testimony, the state and the defense repeatedly showed the video captured by the city police helicopter that assisted in the chase. Two Baltimore officers, Edward Nero and John Bilheimer, testified that they were concerned about the video and felt compelled to report it to their supervisors. Nero was one of the six Baltimore police officers charged in the 2015 arrest and death of Freddie Gray. Nero was acquitted last year, though he still faces a departmental hearing in that case.

Spivey’s attorneys made a point to slow the video down for jurors and give commentary.

“When you slow the video down, you can actually see what happened,” Blanchard, one of the jurors, said afterward.

The defense also called Charles “Joe” Key, an expert in police policy and procedures, who testified that Spivey acted as any “reasonable” officer would.

Another juror, Patty Wise, of Lansdowne said “I am very proud of this officer. He did what he was trained to do.”

Dr. Anand Dutta, 40, a physician from Cockeysville who also was on the panel, said jurors moved quickly after agreeing that the state lacked evidence. Dutta said the video of the incident provided an incomplete picture and that information from the officers on the scene was needed to get the full story. The defense called other officers at the scene who said they did not see Spivey spit on Farrar.

Spivey was suspended with pay for nine months before the trial and still faces an internal investigation.

“We certainly hope that in the future, [the state’s attorney’s office] will investigate these matters more thoroughly before they charge a good cop like Chris Spivey,” said his attorney, Brian Thompson.

He said the state’s attorney’s office wrongly based their investigation on a single video and cautioned that the rush to charge Spivey could deter county police officers from doing their job.

“I think we’ve all seen what’s happened in Baltimore City since the Freddie Gray case. The police have stopped policing, and who could blame them,” Thompson said.

David Rose, second vice president for the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4, expressed similar concerns, and said the state’s attorney’s office wil have to “regain some confidence with the troops at large.”

Baltimore County State’s Attorney Scott Shellenberger defended his office’s actions in pursuing the case against Spivey.

“We felt like we had sufficient evidence based on the video alone,” he said.

Shellenberger said his office carefully evaluates cases involving officers.

“I take my responsibility to police the police very seriously,” he said. “Only twice in 10 years have we prosecuted a police officer for a crime. I think it’s a very important aspect of our job. I believe I owe it to the public in the cases that we think are sufficient to go forward to go forward.”

Spivey appeared relieved after the verdict, and hugged his attorneys in the courtroom. Outside, he thanked jurors for returning a favorable verdict.

They “very delicately looked at each of the facts and testimony,” he said.

Farrar was convicted of theft and attempting to elude police in the incident. He received a three-year sentence last month.

jkanderson@baltsun.com

twitter.com/janders5

FOP Lodge #4 wins the article 6.1c grievance in arbitration

Below is the arbitration award and correction letter for the article 6.1c grievance (me too clause).  In the original award on page 6, the arbitrator refers to “Montgomery County Labor Commissioner”. That is later corrected in a letter from the arbitrator.

The FOP will attempt to begin communication with the County to implement the award.

Arbitration award of Salvatore Arrigo

arbitration correction

 

Executive Security – plain clothes

R.L. Oatman & Associates, Inc. is looking for part-time retired L.E. personnel from the Baltimore County Police Department.
Job Title:  Executive Security – plain clothes
The shift is Monday through Friday
10 hour shift – 7:30 AM – 5:30 PM
Operate a vehicle provided by R.L. Oatman & Associates, Inc. – reporting to the Director of Security on site.
Applicants must have an Active MD. handgun permit
Be qualified to obtain a security license from the MD. State Police – our company will pay the licensing fee.
Please contact Dale Stonesifer – Operations Director
410-494-1126

Baltimore County prosecutors rule fatal Catonsville shooting by off-duty officer justified

Baltimore County prosecutors have ruled that the fatal shooting of a 35-year-old man by an off-duty officer outside a Catonsville Giant store this month was legally justified.

County State’s Attorney Scott D. Shellenberger announced the decision Monday and released surveillance footage from the grocery store at U.S. 40 and Rolling Road.

On Aug. 1, an off-duty officer, who has been identified only as Officer 1st Class McCain of the Parkville precinct, was working security at the store when he confronted Christopher E. Clapp, who was suspected of shoplifting, in the parking lot, police have said.

According to police, Clapp began driving away, dragging McCain.

In the video released Monday, Clapp’s car is seen coming into view with the officer partially seen next to the driver’s side door. As the vehicle comes to a stop, the officer is seen falling to the ground and then getting up. It is not clear from the video exactly when McCain shot Clapp.

In a letter to the police department released Monday, Deputy State’s Attorney Robin S. Coffin wrote that she had reviewed surveillance footage from the Giant, statements from several eyewitnesses, and the statement of the officer. She wrote that McCain reached into the car “to affect the arrest,” and that Clapp then accelerated and began dragging the officer. McCain “repeatedly ordered Mr. Clapp to stop the car,” she wrote.

“At this point, Officer McCain was reasonably in fear that he would be continually dragged by the car or run over by the car,” Coffin wrote. “Officer McCain was justified in shooting Mr. Clapp to save his own life.”

Under an agreement with the police union, the department does not release the first names of officers involved in shootings.

McCain, a 16-year veteran of the department, was not injured in the incident. A passenger in Clapp’s vehicle was not shot but was taken to the hospital with chest pains after the shooting, according to police.

The officer has been returned to regular duty, a police spokesman, Cpl. Shawn Vinson, said.

Prosecutors released other footage Monday that included scenes from inside the store.

Clapp’s brother said his family still has questions about the case. He said the family had seen some of the surveillance footage, but not all of it.

“The history of this country has shown us that those in power can make determinations and it doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the whole truth,” Justin Clapp said.

Christopher Clapp grew up in North Carolina and moved to the Baltimore area this past fall, his brother has said. He previously had lived in the area to attend Towson University.

The case has led County Executive Kevin Kamenetz to call for a review of the body camera policy for officers who work second jobs. The department currently doesn’t require officers who moonlight as security guards in their county uniforms to use body cameras.

County police began to phase in body cameras last year, and McCain had not yet been given a camera, according to the department. All uniformed patrol officers are scheduled to have the cameras by Oct. 1.

Shellenberger said that the surveillance video in this case corroborated statements made to investigators by the officer and witnesses, who included a truck driver, a cashier and a customer.

Police records show Christopher Clapp had another encounter with county police a few days before he was killed. On July 29, a patrol officer said he saw a man being chased by an employee of Nikki’s Liquors in the 7500 block of Belair Road. The man tried to get into a vehicle driven by Clapp, and then got out of the vehicle and placed four liquor bottles on the ground. The man was arrested at the scene and charged.

An officer wrote that he asked the driver, later identified as Clapp, to turn off the vehicle.

“He complied then restarted the car and sped off the lot almost causing a collision,” the officer wrote.

Police were planning to charge Clapp with “aiding in the theft and committing several traffic violations,” according to the police report.

McCain has been involved in one previous shooting. In 2006, he was one of two officers who shot at a carjacking suspect who police say drove toward officers. The man survived and the shooting was ruled justified.

Alisonk@baltsun.com

 

 

Officer Dragged by Suspect Vehicle, Shoots Kills Suspect

Baltimore County Police continue to investigate the circumstances surrounding a police-involved shooting early this morning at the Giant grocery store in Catonsville.

Just before 4 a.m. police responded to the 6000 block of Baltimore National Pike after an off-duty, uniformed Baltimore County Police Officer, working secondary employment at Giant, shot and killed a fleeing suspect as the officer was being dragged by the suspect vehicle over 100 feet across the parking lot.

The suspect previously entered the Giant store with canvas grocery bags and filled them with merchandise, including household items such as laundry detergent. The officer watched the suspect walk past all working registers with the bags of merchandise, making no attempt to pay for the items before exiting the store. The officer quickly confirmed with an employee that the suspect had not paid for the items he’d taken, then followed the suspect outside of the store where he saw him get into the driver’s seat of a Lincoln vehicle with a North Carolina registration plate waiting on the parking lot.

The officer approached the driver side window and verbally engaged the suspect, who responded by putting the car’s gear into drive. The officer reached into the vehicle, ordering the suspect to stop the vehicle multiple times, but the suspect rapidly accelerated, squealing the vehicle’s tires on the pavement and speeding away, dragging the officer with the vehicle. Witnesses heard the officer telling the driver to stop multiple times.  The officer drew his service weapon and fired shots into the vehicle at the suspect, killing the suspect and stopping the vehicle.  The deceased suspect’s identity is not being released until notification of next of kin.

An adult male who was in the front seat of the suspect’s Lincoln at the time of the incident was unharmed, but taken to an area hospital for treatment of chest pains following the incident. He has given police an account of the events that is consistent with the accounts of other independent witnesses at the scene and surveillance video obtained from the Giant store.  The Giant grocery store video will be made available at a later time.

Police determined that the Lincoln was not currently registered but was displaying a North Carolina tag registered to a Subaru. Police are still investigating to determine how the suspect came into possession of the Lincoln, which is not currently reported stolen.

While the officer was wearing his Baltimore County Police issued uniform, he was not equipped with a body-worn camera. The body-worn camera policy does not require it be worn with the uniform if an officer is working in a secondary employment capacity.

Per the agreement with the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #4, the officer involved in the shooting will not be identified at this time. The Homicide Unit investigates all police-involved shootings. Once the investigation is complete, the incident will be reviewed by the Baltimore County State’s Attorney’s Office. The Baltimore County Firearms Discharge Review Board also examines every shot fired by police for compliance with agency policy. As standard procedure, the officer will be placed on administrative status during this process.

Seven Officers to Be Promoted

On August 2, seven Baltimore County police officers will be promoted. The 1 p.m. ceremony will take place at George Washington Carver Center for the Arts and Technology, 938 York Road, Towson 21204. Congratulations to all for their hard work!!

Chief Terrence B. Sheridan and County Executive Kevin Kamenetz will speak at the ceremony and present the certificates. The oath of office will be administered by Julie Ensor, Clerk of the Court, and Reverend Herbert Watson Jr. will offer the invocation and benediction.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments:

  • Sergeant Brian A. Edwards is promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Corporal Dennis H. Kohajda is promoted to the rank of Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 11/Essex.
  • Corporal Marianne L. Snyder is promoted to the rank of Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 9/White Marsh.
  • Corporal David J. Sweren is promoted to the rank of Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Officer Jeremy W. Fumia is promoted to the rank of Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 12/Dundalk.
  • Officer Stuart H. Grantham is promoted to the rank of Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 9/White Marsh.
  • Officer Ernest J. Hannig is promoted to the rank of Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 3/Franklin.

SECURITY CARETAKER

JOB DESCRIPTION:

A dedicated and dependable live-in employee to protect a private residence and all property, interact with family members, staff, vendors and visitors.

The work hours for this position are primarily during the evening, weekends, holidays and when the employer is away.

You will reside in the Security Caretaker’s private apartment on the ground floor of the residence.

Sick, personal and vacation leave is included.

RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • Protect the residence, family, property and staff by maintaining a 24/7 safe and secure environment;
  • Control and monitor access at all entrances, including visitors, groups and event guests;
  • Manage all fire/flood detectors, security alarm systems, indoor/outdoor video cameras and operate detecting/emergency equipment;
  • Respond to alarms, assess the situation and take necessary actions; develop a strong rapport with the security company;
  • Become familiar with and monitor contractors and vendors associated with the residence, e.g. landscapers, trash collections, deliveries, etc.;
  • Observe and take accurate detailed notes of any occurrences and provide reports of suspicious incidents;
  • Become familiar with the art and valuable objects throughout the residence and their various alarms, care and maintenance;
  • Provide backup to household staff as needed from time-to-time, e.g. answering the phones and taking messages, receiving visitors and packages .

 

REQUIREMENTS:

Proven work experience in security, with fire/flood and security alarm systems;

Knowledge of safety and security procedures and protocols;

Surveillance, observation and communication skills.

The position pays $70-80k with a tremendous benefit package to include a one bedroom apartment (nice size) in the main house.

INTELLIGENCE and INVESTIGATIVE DETECTIVE LIEUTENANT PSCS

INTELLIGENCE and INVESTIGATIVE DETECTIVE LIEUTENANT PSCS

Recruitment #17-003707-0002

Department DPSCS Internal Investigation Unit
Date Opened 6/23/2017 3:31:00 PM
Filing Deadline 7/7/2017 11:59:00 PM
Salary $56,743.00 – $91,107.00/year
Employment Type Full-Time
HR Analyst Pandora Johnson
Work Location Howard

Go Back Click HERE to applyClick HERE to view benefits

Introduction

This is a position specific recruitment for the Department of Public Safety & Correctional Services (DPSCS). The resulting eligible list will be used to fill current and future vacancies within DPSCS. This list will be valid for one year.

GRADE

20

LOCATION OF POSITION

8510 Corridor Road, Suite 100

Savage, Maryland 20763

Main Purpose of Job

To provide direct supervision to investigators from the Intelligence and Investigative Division Detective Provisional to Detective Sergeants assigned to the Department of Public Safety & Correctional Services Intelligence & Investigative Division.

POSITION DUTIES

First-line supervisory level of field investigation work involving the investigation of allegations of misconduct or suspected criminal activity involving employees of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, adult inmates confined in a correctional facility or any individual that has contact with the employees or clients-inmates, arrestees, detainees or parolees of the Department.

The employee in the classification directly supervises Intelligence and Investigative Division Detective Provisional‘s and Detective Sergeant’s within the Intelligence and Investigative Division. Responds, guides and directs investigations of a serious nature.

Maintains appropriate time records of subordinates. Conducts first level review of subordinate’s criminal and administrative investigation reports to ensure clarity, logic, impartiality, and proper documentation, consistent with the mission of the Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services.

Maintains case management system that assures timely case assignments and assessment of cases and case numbers, dissemination of information and identification of emerging patterns and conditions relating to corruption.

Tracks case status and numbers on a daily basis. Performs other related duties.

MINIMUM QUALIFICATIONS

Education: High school diploma or G.E.D. certificate acceptable to the Maryland State Board of Education as described in the Police Training Commission regulation.

Experience: Three years of investigative work as an Internal Investigation Detective Sergeant, or three years of comparable law enforcement investigative experience in a municipal, county, state or federal police agency.

Notes:

  1. The above educational requirement is set by the Police Training Commission in accordance with Public Safety Article, Section 3-207.
  2. Applicants may substitute college education for the required general experience at the rate of 60 college credits, including at least 15 credits of criminal justice courses for up to one year of the required experience.
  3. Candidates may substitute U.S. Armed Forces military service experience as a non-commissioned officer in special investigations or military police classifications or specialty codes in the criminal justice field of work at the rate of two years of military experience for one year of experience.

LICENSES, REGISTRATIONS AND CERTIFICATIONS

  1. Candidates must possess and maintain a current Maryland certification as a Police Officer.
  2. Employees in this classification may be assigned duties which require the operation of a motor vehicle. Employees assigned such duties will be required to possess a motor vehicle operator’s license valid in the State of Maryland.

SPECIAL REQUIREMENTS

  1. Employees must meet the selection standards required and successfully complete the training prescribed by the Police Training Commission for police officers in accordance with Public Safety Article, Section 3-207 of the Annotated Code. Selection standards for police officer training are listed in detail in the Code of Maryland Regulations Title 12, Subtitle 04, Chapter 01 and include the following: U.S. Citizenship or Resident Alien status, Must be at least 21 years of age, A complete background investigation Oral interview, Physical examination, Polygraph, and psychological evaluations.
  2. Candidates will be given a medical examination to determine their ability to perform job-related functions. Employees in this classification will be required to bear firearms, and to demonstrate practical knowledge and proficiency in the safe use and care of firearms on a periodic basis.

3.Employees are subject to call-in on a 24-hours a day basis and will be required to provide the employing agency with a telephone number where they can be reached, and carry Telecommunication Device.

  1. Employees in this classification are subject to substance abuse testing in accordance with Code of Maryland Regulations 06.01.09, 12.04.01 and Police Training Commission General Regulation .01-1, Testing for Illegal Use of Drugs.

EXAMINATION PROCESS

The examination will consist of a rating of your education, training, and experience as presented on your application and as they relate to the requirements of the position. Therefore, it is important that you provide complete and accurate information on your application. Successful candidates will be ranked as Best Qualified, Better Qualified, or Qualified and placed on the employment (eligible) list for at least one year.

Please make sure that you provide complete and accurate information on your application to show that you meet the qualifications for this recruitment. All information concerning your qualifications must be submitted by the closing date. We will not consider information submitted after the above closing date.

 

Please apply online at www.dpscs.maryland.gov

 

Internal charges dismissed against Baltimore County officer accused of excessive force

A Baltimore County police officer who was scheduled to go before the department’s first public trial board Monday will instead return to work after internal charges against him were dismissed this week.

Police Chief Terry Sheridan dismissed the charges against Officer Ernest Hannig, who faced termination after an internal affairs investigation concluded that he used excessive force when he used a Taser on a Rosedale man last June.

Police spokeswoman Elise Armacost said in an email that Sheridan consulted with the department’s legal affairs section before he “dismissed the charges in the interest of justice and fairness after additional information came to light.”

Armacost declined to elaborate, saying the department does not comment on personnel matters. She also said Sheridan declined to comment on the case.

Hannig’s attorney, Michael L. Marshall, called the charges “baseless.”

“I wish this happened sooner. I give credit to Chief Sheridan,” Marshall said Friday.

He criticized the department’s internal affairs unit “for letting it get to this.”

An internal investigation concluded that Hannig used excessive force and lied on an incident report after an incident involving Charles Chapman.

On June 16, 2016, Hannig was called to the Rosedale area, where witnesses reported Chapman was disrobing on a ramp from U.S. 40 onto the Baltimore Beltway.

Hannig said the man’s behavior changed from being “highly aggressive to being relatively calm and catatonic,” and that he used his Taser because Chapman began to walk toward him with clenched fists, according to a disciplinary report on the incident.

A supervisor who later reviewed Taser camera video of the incident said Hannig “embellished the actions of Mr. Chapman in order to justify a use of force that was out of policy,” and recommended his termination.

Marshall disputed the department’s contention that Hannig lied. He said Hannig felt Chapman was coming at him, which was reflected in the video. He also noted that Hannig was aware that the incident was being recorded and would be reviewed.

During the internal investigation, Hannig was suspended with pay and lost his police powers.

Before the charges were dismissed, he had been scheduled to go before the trial board, a three-member panel made up of a commander, a lieutenant and a person of the same rank as the accused, which can make its own recommendations to the police chief.

Armacost said Hannig, a 15-year veteran of the department, remains assigned to the mobile crisis unit. The unit pairs a mental health clinician with officers for calls involving people with known or suspected mental health issues.

“He’s obviously glad to be going to work,” Marshall said of Hannig.

Chapman was not seriously injured in the incident, Marshall said. He was taken to a hospital to have the Taser prongs removed and was not charged in the incident.

Neither Chapman nor his family could be reached for comment.

jkanderson@baltsun.com

twitter.com/janders5

Dundalk Gunman who shot at police had extensive police record

The gunman killed in a Wednesday shootout in Dundalk had an open warrant in Pennsylvania and was prohibited from possessing firearms because of a previous conviction, Baltimore County police said Thursday.

Police identified the gunman Thursday as 35-year-old Blaine Robert Erb, of no fixed address. Erb was killed by police during the exchange of gunfire, which also left a bystander wounded and a police officer in serious condition.

Authorities identified the wounded officer as Officer First Class Slocum, a 13-year veteran of the county police. She was shot twice in the lower body and remains in serious condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. Baltimore County police do not publicly release the full names of officers in these cases, citing an agreement with the police union.

The bystander, a 21-year-old Baltimore woman, suffered a gunshot wound and is expected to survive, police said. Her name also was not released, and police had not determined who shot her.

Officers responded to the 3400 block of Dundalk Ave. near Avon Beach Road at 2:49 p.m. Wednesday for a report of an armed robbery in progress, police said. At the scene they learned a man — later identified as Erb — ran onto a nearby No. 10 Maryland Transit Administration bus. Police said Erb had robbed two people at gunpoint before the shooting began.

When officers stopped the bus near the Logan Village Shopping Center about a block away and confronted Erb, he opened fire, they said. The incident culminated in a shootout that left Erb dead on a nearby lawn.

Police said Thursday that four officers had fired their weapons at Erb. The officers, whose names have not been released, were placed on routine administrative leave. At least one officer was wearing a body camera, police said, but all visual and audio recordings will not yet be released because they are part of the investigation.

Investigators found two .40-caliber handguns next to Erb’s body, as well as gun magazines and ammunition. Police said they are looking into where Erb obtained the firearms.

Police said Erb’s previous charges have included robbery, weapon violations, assault and theft. There was also a bench warrant for Erb in York County, Pa., for failure to appear on DUI charges, county police spokeswoman Officer Jennifer Peach said.

Online court records indicate that Erb pleaded guilty in 2012 in Anne Arundel County to a charge of possessing contraband in jail. He pleaded guilty in 2011 in Somerset County to second-degree assault. In Baltimore County in 2003, Erb pleaded guilty to attempted robbery, court records show.

By Michael Brice-Saddler

and Carrie Wells

The Baltimore Sun

Baltimore Sun reporter Alison Knezevich contributed to this article.

mbricesaddler@baltsun.com

@TheArtist_MBS

Employment Opportunity

Centennial Protection Group has full time and part time positions for an executive residential detail in the Baltimore County Maryland area.

This is a long-term continuous opportunity and perfect for retired Law Enforcement. Qualified applicants need to submit their resumes to hr@centennialprotects.com Please list “Executive Residential Detail” as the subject.

Qualifications: High school diploma or equivalent Verifiable and successful completion of a respected executive protection training school OR prior law enforcement experience. Ability to be certified for a Maryland Handgun and Private Detective license (required for MD protection assignments) No criminal convictions Ability to pass a comprehensive background investigation Drug Free (applicants and employees subject to initial and random drug testing) Flexible Great team attitude Physically fit Valid driver’s license Assignment Information: Executive Residential Only.

CPG will provide more detail upon selection. Location: Baltimore County Maryland Time Frame: Immediate opening Hiring: 1 Full Time and 1 Part Time Pay: $47,800 per year plus holiday pay Closing Date: Open until filled www.centnnialprotects.com Contact: Dave Hopp 443-677-1092

Congratulations to all on their promotion

On May 25 at 1 p.m., six Baltimore County police officers will be promoted. The ceremony will take place in the Vista Room at Timonium Fairgrounds, 2200 York Road, Timonium 21093.

Chief Terrence B. Sheridan will speak at the ceremony and present the certificates. The oath of office will be administered by the Honorable Julie Ensor, Clerk for Baltimore County. The invocation and benediction will be offered by the Reverend Darron D. McKinney Sr., a police chaplain.

The following is the list of the promoted officers and their new assignments.

  • Sergeant Keith Fruhling is promoted to Lieutenant and is assigned to Precinct 11 Essex.
  • Corporal Thomas Morehouse is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 9 White Marsh.
  • Corporal James Gill is promoted to Sergeant and is assigned to Precinct 11 Essex.
  • Officer Melinda Mori is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 4 Pikesville.
  • Officer Jessica Beale is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 1 Wilkens.
  • Officer Eric Brennan is promoted to Corporal and is assigned to Precinct 8 Parkvill